dogs

09 July 2020

dogs
  • Keep your dog safe and trained during COVID-19
    09 July 2020

    Keep your dog safe and trained during COVID-19 CRITICAL THINGS TO DO TO KEEP YOUR DOG SAFE… NOW, and AFTER SOCIAL DISTANCING.   People have asked me if this is a good time to adopt a puppy or dog. Yes & No.  There are challenges.  

    The post Keep your dog safe and trained during COVID-19 appeared first on The Pooch Coach.

  • Canine Adventure Log 3
    09 July 2020

    Rose Noar Tales and Tails - The hilarity of everyday life

    It’s me again, Rose, here to share another fabulous canine adventure log with you. By now you know that my human and I have been doing our fair share of kayaking on calm lakes. We haven’t gone out and tried anything crazy yet, but we do have our fun.  My cousin, Indigo, is also polishing [...]

    The post Canine Adventure Log 3 appeared first on Tales and Tails.

  • How to Prevent Pet Urine From Killing Grass
    09 July 2020

    No dog owner in the world is crazy about those ugly stains caused by their dogs’ urine. Unfortunately, they’re kind of inevitable … or are they?! I’m going to share a few workarounds I’ve found to prevent pet urine from killing grass. I’m Barbara and I write regularly for That Mutt. I’m also a blogger …

    How to Prevent Pet Urine From Killing Grass Read More »

    The post How to Prevent Pet Urine From Killing Grass appeared first on ThatMutt.com.

  • Why Bone Broth Is The Ultimate Superfood
    09 July 2020

    Wellness trends and products are all the rage these days. With so many new health food trends making their way into healthcare conversations, it’s no wonder our pups have begun to benefit from these ideas as well! Our pets are a part of our family, so it’s important to keep up to date on the best nutritional products that offer them a longer and healthier life.

    When it comes to creating a well-rounded menu for your furry friend, there’s one ingredient that you’ll hear of often; bone broth. Let’s dive into the many benefits of this impressive super food and discuss how bone broth for dogs can change your furry friend’s life!

    What are the benefits of bone broth for dogs?

    While dogs certainly love the taste that bone broth adds to their meals, it’s much more than just a flavor boost. Bone broth is proven to be jam packed with beneficial ingredients that not only boost their immune system, but also offer nutritional support as your dog begins to age. 

    10 of the beneficial nutrients you’ll find in bone broth include:

    • Amino acids: Amino acids are responsible for important body functions such as supporting bone strength, building and repairing muscle, and helping the body absorb nutrients effectively. 
    • Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs): GAGs are responsible for maintaining the collagen that you’ll find as a support between the bones and connective tissues. GAGs are commonly found in top rated joint supplements for dogs, as the most well-known forms of glycosaminoglycans are chondroitin sulfate, glucosamine and hyaluronic acid. These ingredients together help to cushion the joints, reduce joint inflammation, and lessen the deterioration of the joints over time. 
    • Collagen/Gelatin: Collagen breakdown results in gelatin, which is a helpful ingredient in terms of joint health for dogs. Gelatin provides a cushion for your dog between their joints, helping them to move with ease and live a more active life. 
    • Vitamins: Bone broth is a wonderful source of vitamins A, B-1, B-2 , B-3, B-6, B-12, C, D, and K. Each of these vitamins together offer extra immune support, assistance in repairing muscle, as well as bone and teeth support. 
    • Iron: Iron plays a key role in helping your pup transport oxygen throughout their body. Not only does it team up with your dog’s red blood cells, it also helps to maintain their skin and fur health. 
    • Electrolytes: Electrolytes play a key role in helping our dogs maintain heart and respiratory health, contract their muscles, as well as maintaining strength throughout the day. The electrolytes in bone broth include potassium, calcium, magnesium, sodium, and chloride.
    • Silicon: Similar to collagen and gelatin, silicon aids in the strength and flexibility of the connective tissues in your dog’s body. 
    • Phosphorus: Phosphorus is another helpful agent that helps to strengthen and repair bones, strengthen teeth, as well as help the muscles to contract. 
    • Zinc: Zinc is one of the most important components when it comes to your dog’s muscular and skeletal system. Zinc aids in necessary healing of bones and connective tissue, as well as offering strength for these tissues throughout your dog’s life. 
    • Copper: Copper is another beneficial ingredient that teams up with your dog’s cardiovascular system. Copper aids in the production of red blood cells, as well as helping to eliminate free radicals in the body. 
    How do you give your dog bone broth?

    Bone broth is an appealing option for any dog owner because it can be added to a dog’s existing diet! It is a simple way to add nutrients to your dog’s regular feeding routine. Bone broth can be poured over your dog’s dry food, mixed into homemade or raw food, used to reconstitute dehydrated food, frozen and offered as a pupsicle, or infused with treats that can be offered at snack time. 

    Don’t have the time or patience to make your own bone broth? No problem! Brutus Broth has crafted multiple forms of the beneficial and tasty bone broth that your furry friend will crave!

    Who is Brutus Bone Broth?

    The Brutus Broth story began when a family gathered around the table for Thanksgiving dinner  in 2016. When asked about the family dog Brutus and how they’ve managed to maintain his health throughout the years, Kim and Sue had a simple answer: “Love and Grandma’s Bone Broth.” 

    After seeing how much bone broth benefited their senior pup’s life, they knew they had to find a way to share these benefits with other dogs. After spending thousands of hours researching the pet markets and speaking with experts in the industry, the recipe of Brutus Bone Broth was formed and brought to market!

    What Makes Brutus Bone Broth Special? 

    Brutus Bone Broth is created in a USDA approved human-grade facility in Minnesota. Each recipe is made with the highest quality ingredients, crafted together to help boost your dog’s overall health. Not only do they offer a tasty broth that your pup is sure to love, but they pack their recipes with added nutrients that you won’t find anywhere else on the market. Brutus broth is fortified with chondroitin and glucosamine to support your dog’s joint health, as well as turmeric to combat inflammation. Their bone broth has been hand crafted with all-natural ingredients to help aid in the longevity of your beloved companion’s life.

    “We’re a small, family owned and operated company – our products are created in the kitchen, not a boardroom.”

    A Brutus Broth motto is “if it is good enough for me, it is good enough for my dog!” Oftentimes you will find Kim and Sue in their Manufacturer’s kitchen testing the bone broth themselves for quality and taste! Brutus Broth adds valuable nutrition to every dog bowl it touches, turning each meal into an affordable culinary experience!

    Dogs are exposed to toxins every day that can build up in their digestive system and can cause “leaky gut,” resulting in various health issues. Adding bone broth to your dog’s every day diet can naturally detoxify and boost their immune system so they can live a healthier, happy life.  

    Offer For iHeartDogs 

    Brutus Broth has teamed up with iHeartDogs to offer a 20% discount site wide to iHeartDogs readers. This means your pup can get their paws on delicious products such as:

    Each recipe is packed with the high quality ingredients that we’ve mentioned above, as well as the delicious flavor that your furry friend is sure to love! This is a wonderful opportunity to improve your dog’s wellness while enhancing their meal experience. Just enter iHeartDogs20 at check out through December 31st to take advantage of this pawsome offer!

    We think your dog deserves the very best when it comes to their health and wellness! Now is the time to take advantage of this incredible offer to show them you care! Your pup is sure to thank you for it!

    The post Why Bone Broth Is The Ultimate Superfood appeared first on iHeartDogs.com.

  • Why Bone Broth Is The Ultimate Superfood
    08 July 2020

    Wellness trends and products are all the rage these days. With so many new health food trends making their way into healthcare conversations, it’s no wonder our pups have begun to benefit from these ideas as well! Our pets are a part of our family, so it’s important to keep up to date on the best nutritional products that offer them a longer and healthier life.

    When it comes to creating a well-rounded menu for your furry friend, there’s one ingredient that you’ll hear of often; bone broth. Let’s dive into the many benefits of this impressive super food and discuss how bone broth for dogs can change your furry friend’s life!

    What are the benefits of bone broth for dogs?

    While dogs certainly love the taste that bone broth adds to their meals, it’s much more than just a flavor boost. Bone broth is proven to be jam packed with beneficial ingredients that not only boost their immune system, but also offer nutritional support as your dog begins to age. 

    10 of the beneficial nutrients you’ll find in bone broth include:

    • Amino acids: Amino acids are responsible for important body functions such as supporting bone strength, building and repairing muscle, and helping the body absorb nutrients effectively. 
    • Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs): GAGs are responsible for maintaining the collagen that you’ll find as a support between the bones and connective tissues. GAGs are commonly found in top rated joint supplements for dogs, as the most well-known forms of glycosaminoglycans are chondroitin sulfate, glucosamine and hyaluronic acid. These ingredients together help to cushion the joints, reduce joint inflammation, and lessen the deterioration of the joints over time. 
    • Collagen/Gelatin: Collagen breakdown results in gelatin, which is a helpful ingredient in terms of joint health for dogs. Gelatin provides a cushion for your dog between their joints, helping them to move with ease and live a more active life. 
    • Vitamins: Bone broth is a wonderful source of vitamins A, B-1, B-2 , B-3, B-6, B-12, C, D, and K. Each of these vitamins together offer extra immune support, assistance in repairing muscle, as well as bone and teeth support. 
    • Iron: Iron plays a key role in helping your pup transport oxygen throughout their body. Not only does it team up with your dog’s red blood cells, it also helps to maintain their skin and fur health. 
    • Electrolytes: Electrolytes play a key role in helping our dogs maintain heart and respiratory health, contract their muscles, as well as maintaining strength throughout the day. The electrolytes in bone broth include potassium, calcium, magnesium, sodium, and chloride.
    • Silicon: Similar to collagen and gelatin, silicon aids in the strength and flexibility of the connective tissues in your dog’s body. 
    • Phosphorus: Phosphorus is another helpful agent that helps to strengthen and repair bones, strengthen teeth, as well as help the muscles to contract. 
    • Zinc: Zinc is one of the most important components when it comes to your dog’s muscular and skeletal system. Zinc aids in necessary healing of bones and connective tissue, as well as offering strength for these tissues throughout your dog’s life. 
    • Copper: Copper is another beneficial ingredient that teams up with your dog’s cardiovascular system. Copper aids in the production of red blood cells, as well as helping to eliminate free radicals in the body. 
    How do you give your dog bone broth?

    Bone broth is an appealing option for any dog owner because it can be added to a dog’s existing diet! It is a simple way to add nutrients to your dog’s regular feeding routine. Bone broth can be poured over your dog’s dry food, mixed into homemade or raw food, used to reconstitute dehydrated food, frozen and offered as a pupsicle, or infused with treats that can be offered at snack time. 

    Don’t have the time or patience to make your own bone broth? No problem! Brutus Broth has crafted multiple forms of the beneficial and tasty bone broth that your furry friend will crave!

    Who is Brutus Broth?

    The Brutus Broth story began when a family gathered around the table for Thanksgiving dinner  in 2016. When asked about the family dog Brutus and how they’ve managed to maintain his health throughout the years, Kim and Sue had a simple answer: “Love and Grandma’s Bone Broth.” 

    After seeing how much bone broth benefited their senior pup’s life, they knew they had to find a way to share these benefits with other dogs. After spending thousands of hours researching the pet markets and speaking with experts in the industry, the recipe of Brutus Bone Broth was formed and brought to market!

    What Makes Brutus Bone Broth Special? 

    Brutus Bone Broth is created in a USDA approved human-grade facility in Minneapolis. Each recipe is made with the highest quality ingredients, crafted together to help boost your dog’s overall health. Not only do they offer a tasty broth that your pup is sure to love, but they pack their recipes with added nutrients that you won’t find anywhere else on the market. Brutus broth is fortified with chondroitin and glucosamine to support your dog’s joint health, as well as turmeric to combat inflammation. Their bone broth has been hand crafted with all-natural ingredients to help aid in the longevity of your beloved companion’s life.

    “We’re a small, family owned and operated company – our products are created in the kitchen, not a boardroom.”

    A Brutus Broth motto is “if it is good enough for me, it is good enough for my dog!” Oftentimes you will find Kim and Sue in their Manufacturer’s kitchen testing the bone broth themselves for quality and taste! Brutus Broth adds valuable nutrition to every dog bowl it touches, turning each meal into an affordable culinary experience!

    Dogs are exposed to toxins every day that can build up in their digestive system and can cause “leaky gut,” resulting in various health issues. Adding bone broth to your dog’s every day diet can naturally detoxify and boost their immune system so they can live a healthier, happy life.  

    Offer For iHeartDogs 

    Brutus Broth has teamed up with iHeartDogs to offer a 20% discount site wide to iHeartDogs readers. This means your pup can get their paws on delicious products such as:

    Each recipe is packed with the high quality ingredients that we’ve mentioned above, as well as the delicious flavor that your furry friend is sure to love! This is a wonderful opportunity to improve your dog’s wellness while enhancing their meal experience. Just enter iHeartDogs20 at check out through December 31st to take advantage of this pawsome offer!

    We think your dog deserves the very best when it comes to their health and wellness! Now is the time to take advantage of this incredible offer to show them you care! Your pup is sure to thank you for it!

    The post Why Bone Broth Is The Ultimate Superfood appeared first on iHeartDogs.com.

  • Thanks To You, 2 Broken Back Legs Won’t Stop Ruthie!
    08 July 2020

    Part of each sale on the iHeartDogs.comstore is donated to GreaterGood.org, which offers grants for charities and programs like Rescue Bank. Some rescues could not run without the kind donations from organizations like this. Customers like you are the reason uplifting stories like the one below are possible!

    At just 2-3 months old, little puppy Ruthie was abandoned. When rescuers found her, she was emaciated, covered in pyoderma, and had two broken back legs. Soon after she arrived at Detroit Animal Care and Control, I Heart Dogs Rescue & Animal Haven committed to getting Ruthie the medical care she needed to survive.

    Courtesy of I Heart Dogs Rescue & Animal Haven

    They took her to Eastpointe Animal Hospital for emergency surgery. Ruthie eventually had plates inserted in her legs that will need removal in the upcoming months. For now though, she’s moving around freely and in the loving care of a foster family.

    “The little girl must have been in so much pain with two broken legs, but she is happily walking around now after getting hardware in both legs.” – I Heart Dogs Rescue & Animal Haven via Facebook

    Courtesy of I Heart Dogs Rescue & Animal Haven

    Your support, the kindness of rescue organizations like I Heart Dogs Rescue & Animal Haven, and skilled veterinarians saved this abandoned girl’s life!

    How Rescue Bank Helped Ruthie

    The lifesaving surgery Ruthie needed cost over $2,000, but the rescue, fortunately, numbers among Rescue Bank‘s partners. So, what does this mean? It means they can focus fewer resources on food purchases and more on other important efforts.

    Rescue Bank operates on a food bank model. They receive food donations from manufacturers and retailers and distribute it to their partner organizations. When nutritious pet food nears its “best by” date, has minor packaging defects, or is being re-branded, manufacturers will donate that food. Then, Rescue Bank makes food grants to community-based animal welfare groups.

    @IHeartDogsRescue/Facebook

    These donations allow the rescues to use their funds where they’re most needed. In this case, that money paid for Ruthie’s surgery. Since I Heart Dogs Rescue saved money on nutritious food, they were able to put it towards helping poor Ruthie. They shared:

    “Because of Rescue Bank, we are able to get dogs like Ruthie the medical treatment they need and the nutrition too! Donations of food and other supplies we might regularly have to purchase frees up funds to go toward animals in need of extraordinary care.”

    To help out more dogs like Ruthie, shop for eligible products in the iHeartDogs store!

    The post Thanks To You, 2 Broken Back Legs Won’t Stop Ruthie! appeared first on iHeartDogs.com.

  • You Helped Rebuild This Shelter After Hurricane Dorian
    08 July 2020

    When you purchase items from the iHeartDogs store, a portion of those proceeds go to GreaterGood. GreaterGood uses those donations to save many dogs in need. Thanks to loyal customers like you, many dogs’ lives are improved with these donations. This shelter in the Bahamas is one of the many places that have benefited from GreaterGood donations.

    After Hurricane Dorian, the Humane Society of Grand Bahama was in rough shape. The hurricane hit the island with 185 mph winds on September 2nd, 2019. Then, it stalled over the area for a while, causing 36 inches of rain on top of the damage that was already caused. The shelter ended up having about 12 feet of water in it.

    After the storm, the shelter had to get rid of all of its belongings due to the damage. There was mold growing in the drywall, the windows were destroyed, and the kennels were rusting. Around the property, lots of trees had fallen, meaning there was no shade for the outdoor play areas. The fence outside was also severely damaged. Major items like the AC and water pump needed to be replaced.

    As if Dorian’s damage wasn’t bad enough, a wildfire started nearby, only 10 days after the hurricane. The shelter needed all the help and support they could get.

    GreaterGood’s Rescue Rebuild team came to the shelter not long after the hurricane hit. Their goal was to fix it up and help the staff return to their normal operations, which consisted of adopting out over 100 animals per month.

    “We made it safely to the Grand Bahama, where the staff greeted us with open arms and full, yet still broken, hearts,” said Rescue Rebuild. “The team did everything they possibly could in these two weeks.”

    Rebuilding the Shelter

    First, the team cleared all the debris to help prevent future wildfires from occurring. They also made necessary repairs to the outdoor fence so the dogs could safely play outside. Additionally, they put up sun sails for the play yards to provide shade for the dogs. They even upgraded the outdoor water buckets to ensure that no dogs would tip them over.

    Inside, the team replaced 62 windows and 16 doors. They also used their funds to replace the plumbing, electric, water heater, and water pump, which had all been damaged by the flooding. Additionally, they improved the kennels in a way that will help the staff get the dogs out if something like this were to happen again. Each kennel also received a brand new raised dog bed.

    Finally, the team did some work for the staff too. They took down all the moldy drywall and covered it with a fresh coat of paint. They also helped add a new reception desk and new furniture. Now, there’s even a special area that’s designated as the staff break room. The entire shelter looks as good as new all because of their hard work!

    Thanks to purchases from the iHeartDogs store, many dogs, shelters, and rescues benefit, allowing more dogs to be saved. iHeartDogs sells a wide variety of products for both you and your furry friend. Every purchase can change the world for a dog in need, so thank you to all the kind heroes who have bought iHeartDogs products!

    Images from GreaterGood.org

    The post You Helped Rebuild This Shelter After Hurricane Dorian appeared first on iHeartDogs.com.

  • You Helped Rescue 12 Dogs From A Hoarding Situation
    08 July 2020

    When you purchase items from the iHeartDogs store, a portion of that profit is donated to GreaterGood. GreaterGood is an incredible organization that supports lots of dogs in need. Thanks to loyal customers like you, many dogs get a second chance at life all because of these donations. These twelve pups are just some of the many dogs that GreaterGood has saved.

    NBS Animal Rescue received a serious call from Warren Animal Control. It was about a hoarding situation that involved a group of Poodle mixes that were living in terrible conditions. The house was a mess, and the poor dogs were ill, starving, matted, and emaciated. It stunk of urine and feces, and there were cockroaches, fleas, and flies all over the place.

    On top of everything, the poor dogs had been left alone for two weeks without food and water. It was the most heartbreaking sight the organization had ever seen.

    Rescuing the Dogs

    Luckily, NBS was able to rescue twelve dogs from the home. The house was so cluttered that it was difficult to locate all the pups. Therefore, they had to set up traps to lure the dogs out of their hiding places. These dogs were rushed to the emergency vet for immediate care. Four of the dogs were in such critical condition that they had to stay at the emergency vet for four days.

    It cost over $3,000 to save these dogs, but thankfully, all twelve pups survived. NBS gladly took them into their care. They provided all their basic needs and gave them lots of love.

    Before long, all the dogs were happy, healthy, and clean. Once the dogs were spayed or neutered, they quickly started finding forever families. If you saw them today, you wouldn’t even know they’re the same dogs! These amazing transformations are all thanks to GreaterGood’s Rescue Bank.

    “Rescue Bank allows us to put money that would normally be spent on food toward critical and emergency care,” said NBS. “We take in many dogs that have health issues and/or are seniors that require more than basic shots and getting fixed. We could not provide that extra care if it were not for the help from our partners.”

    Thanks to purchases from the iHeartDogs store, dogs like these twelve neglected pups get to see what true love is like. iHeartDogs sells a wide variety of products for both you and your furry friend. Every purchase can make a difference for a dog, so thank you to all the kind heroes that have purchased iHeartDogs products!

    Images from NBS Animal Rescue

    The post You Helped Rescue 12 Dogs From A Hoarding Situation appeared first on iHeartDogs.com.

  • Do Cocker Spaniels Shed A Lot?
    08 July 2020

    The post Do Cocker Spaniels Shed A Lot? appeared first on Fidose of Reality. If you are seeing this message on a website, then this content has been scraped and is being shown without our permission and is in violation of copyright law.

    When I fell in love with dogs at a very young age, Cocker Spaniels stole my heart. I had no idea if Cocker Spaniels shed a lot at the time. Now that I’ve had Cockers for 30 years, I know the answer to the great shedding question. All Cocker Spaniels shed to some degree, but […]

  • Is my dog overweight? How to find out and what to do
    08 July 2020

    Overweight dogs are a massive issue for many owners. It leads to a bunch of health problems. However, your dog’s overweight doesn’t mean you are a bad pet parent.

    by Guest Blogger, Jimmie O Chutt

    Overweight dogs are a massive issue for many owners. It leads to a bunch of health problems. However, your dog’s overweight doesn’t mean you are a bad pet parent. None of us are safe from this complication.

    Excess weight and obesity can have a destructive effect on your dog’s health. The most common problems are diabetes, arthritis, and joint disorders. However, there are a couple of ways to prevent being overweight. It is beneficial to know what exactly your dog needs to stay healthy and slim. Here are some methods that will be very helpful for your pet.

    How a dog becomes overweight

    Busy owner = lazy dog. It is often correct because our pace of life leaves no time to play with our pets. This may lead to weight issues. In fact, the lack of activity is the number one reason for this problem. The second one is overfeeding. If they are combined together, it is double trouble. Some breeds are more inclined to gain weight, such as golden retrievers, bulldogs, and cocker spaniels.

    Some pet owners think that pretty cheeks are adorable. However, the price your dog pays for it is very high. Extra weight may lead to heart disease, high blood pressure, and even cancer. It’s no fun, right? Moreover, your pet may face respiratory conditions, behavioral problems, and a reduction of lifespan.

    And it is not the full list of problems.

    How can you tell if your dog is overweight

    If you still have doubts about whether your dog is overweight or not, you should consult your veterinarian. However, there are some things you can notice on your own. It will be very helpful if you check your dog on a regular basis. Pets don’t become overweight at once. It is better to notice some signs beforehand and don’t let things get out of control.

    1. The weight of your dog is higher than usual

    That’s an obvious sign. But only at first sight. Many dog owners don’t pay attention to some extra pounds on a scale. They think it’s just a matter of time, and their dog will lose this weight easily. But that’s not how you want to cope with this.

    First of all, you need to understand which weight is average for your breed. Get a calculator and do some math. Surf the internet and find a chart describing your dog’s perfect weight. You should take into account the breed, height, and weight of your pet.

    If your dog happens to be 5 to 20% heavier than it is supposed to be, that means that he or she is overweight. You should make a small change in diet. If your dog’s weight is more than 120% of the normal weight, then changes in nutrition won’t be enough because your dog has obesity problems. Please consult your vet and develop an individual program of losing weight that will include proper nutrition and physical activity.

    2. You don’t feel the ribs

    That’s one of the simplest and most effective tests that work with dogs, cats, and other small pets. Take your dog and run your hands around its flanks and abdomen. If your pet has a healthy weight, you’ll feel all the ribs. However, you should not see them. This would mean that your dog is too skinny.

    If you can’t find the ribs, you need to change your dog’s diet and find time for some exercises.

    3. Your dog’s body looks like a tube

    Face your dog and look at its shape. The chest must be wider than the waist. In fact, an hourglass shape is the best variant not only for girls but also for your pet. If your dog’s waist is thicker than all other parts of the body, it’s a signal for you to change the diet. Call your vet and consult him/her as soon as possible.

    4. Your dog is not interested in physical activities anymore

    Dogs are usually very energetic and friendly animals. They try to involve their owners in their everyday activities as much as possible. They love to catch their tail, run around, and become very enthusiastic every time a human being comes back home.

    However, when a dog gains weight, it’s perfect leisure time looks like sleeping on a couch. You may think that your dog became apathetic because it has grown up. That’s not correct. In 90% of cases, the reason is overweight. Heavyweight exhausts your pet. It feels tired all the time. That’s why you don’t go out as often as before. That’s a very significant sign. Call your vet the moment you notice any changes in your dog’s behavior.

    5. Lack of stamina

    Let us suppose that your dog still plays outside, tries to catch its tail, and is quite energetic when it sees you. That’s cool. But the keyword is “quite”. You may notice that your four-legged friend cannot do it all as much as before. It still goes outside, but the walk takes 30 minutes instead of 1 hour as before. Then your dog just gets tired and lies on the floor. That’s one of the first signs that your pet has weight issues. For instance, if your pet has an extra 12 pounds, it has to carry them all day long. That’s why it gets exhausted fast.

    All these extra pounds are additional pressure on the bones. Moreover, your dog’s heart needs to provide the body with excess blood. It is not healthy at all. Keep an eye on your buddy and notice all the changes in its behavior. Don’t let it gain extra weight.

    6. Your dog is not coming to the second floor

    It is also one of the first signs that your dog is not all right. If you started to notice that your pet is not following you when you go upstairs anymore, that can be dangerous. However, this can be just a change in its behavior.

    Try to watch your dog for a day or two. Is it still downstairs when you go up? How many attempts does your dog need to jump on the couch? This can be a crucial factor. If it has to make more than 3 attempts to reach the goal, it’s time to call your vet.

    What you should do

    In this article, we give advance tips. However, we have a separate article with basic ones. This is a developed version. Of course, it would be better to consult your vet before making any changes to your dog’s diet. However, there is a list of products you can try right from the start. They are very healthy and won’t do any harm.

    1. Add the weight loss supplements to your dog’s diet

    If you want to keep your pet fit, you need to add some supplements to its diet. When combined with an exercise program, these products can help your dog to lose weight very soon. There are some very effective ones to help your pet get slim and healthy.

    It may help to ease achy joints and perhaps encourage weight loss. Omega-3 fatty acid supplement affects the mitochondrion. It is a cell that is responsible for generating energy from digested food. This acid has a fat-burning effect that will help your dog to lose weight very fast. However, you should consult your vet to choose the correct proportion. You don’t want your dog to become too skinny, right?

    • L-carnitine

    This free-form amino acid promotes lean muscle mass in some studies. It deals with obesity, feline hepatic lipidosis, and behavioral health. One study followed 30 obese dogs. They were divided into 3 groups. The first one was given 50 ppm of carnitine daily. The second one – 100 ppm. In seven weeks’ time, dogs from the first and second groups lost 6.4% and 5.7% of their body weight correspondingly. Dogs in the third group didn’t get any L-carnitine. They lost only 1.8% of their weight.

    2. Do NOT get rid of dog treats

    There are special low-calorie treats you can give to your dog each time it deserves it. The ingredients may vary. The snacks can be made of sweet potatoes, vegetables, and even freeze-dried lamb lungs. Yes, the latter is a serious doggy favorite.

    Such products are usually fat-free and high in healthy nutrients. That’s why it is safe to give it to your dog 4-5 times a day.

    3. Add vegetables and fruits to your dog’s diet

    Vegetables and fruits are low in calories, so it’s absolutely safe to include them in your pet’s diet. Moreover, that’s how you can diversify the meal.

    It is a great alternative to highly-processed store-bought treats. It would be great if you mix them into your dog’s diet.

    Green beans and baby carrots are a perfect snack for your dog. These products are gentle on the tummy, so your buddy won’t have any digestion problems.

    Raspberries and apples are a huge source of fiber. If you give these fruits to your dog regularly, you’ll notice positive changes very soon.

    You can also give celery, broccoli, cucumbers, and bananas or ice cubes. These naturally nutritious, tasty tidbits are a healthy option for many dogs.

    In a word

    We all love treating our dogs. However, sometimes it is necessary to pull yourself together and limit tasty food for your dog. Remember that a strict diet and exercises are the way you express your love to your four-legged friend. Your dog won’t think that you love it less if you change its daily habits. Stay strong, and soon enough, your dog will get healthy and happy!

    about the author

    Jimmie has tremendous experience with cats. He is a proud dad of Ronnie the cat and he is CEO at CatPet.club – online magazine about feline behavior and nutrition.

    Did you enjoy this post? We’d love for you to subscribe to our blog

    The post Is my dog overweight? How to find out and what to do appeared first on Acme Canine.

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Blogs Just Released - Dogs

  • 5 Best Odor Resistant Dog Beds
    Written by
    5 Best Odor Resistant Dog Beds There is no doubt that dogs are more than just a pet. They are our loyal companions that give us the best kind of friendship during their lives. Therefore, it is hard to come up with a con of having a dog, but dog odor is undoubtedly one. Keeping your house free from dog smell can be a hard thing to do sometimes, and a dog bed that is not good at keeping the odors away can add to the issue.
    Written on Saturday, 17 August 2019 13:58 in Dogs Be the first to comment! Read 345 times Read more...
  • Best Dog Food for Cockapoo
    Written by
    Best Dog Food for Cockapoo Being a cross breed between Cocker Spaniel and Poodle, Cockapoo has got the characteristics of both breeds. It is energetic, playful, and incredibly friendly, and they are just excellent pets. They are also a generally healthy breed, and they can live up to 20 years (yes, you've read it right). However, to ensure that your pup lives the healthiest life it can live, there are some measures you can take, and feeding it the right food is a huge one. So, we prepared a list to help you to find the best dog food for your Cockapoo.
    Written on Saturday, 17 August 2019 13:53 in Dogs Be the first to comment! Read 404 times
  • White German Shepherd
    Written by
    Written on Tuesday, 01 January 2019 16:41 in Dogs Be the first to comment! Read 605 times

Blog Calendar - Dogs

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Dog Food Blogs

09 July 2020

Dog Food Blogs

Dog Grooming Blogs

09 July 2020

Dog Grooming Blogs
  • 10 blade image
    09 July 2020
  • 10 blade groom - odd behavior
    09 July 2020

    I got my dog groomed all over with a 10 blade (groomer said this would be good because she hadn’t been shaved in 7 months because of lockdown). Her hair is a double coat wire (miniature poodle-chihuahua). It’s incredibly short now obviously but generally grows back very quick.

    There are no nicks anywhere and as far as I can see from the cut she is fine. However, her behavior has been weird for the past 3 days (normally after a groom she is fine the next day). This is the shortest I have ever gone for her.

    She hasn’t ate a meal since I’ve brought her home, isn’t smiling (dog loves to smile), and is constantly scratching herself. When I try to pick her up (normally cuddles like a baby), she tries to run away.

    Do you think something happened at the groomer or she’s just reacting to the different feeling and sensation on her body?

    submitted by /u/abw52292
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  • You are a dog groomer?! Do you play with dogs all day?! Nope.
    09 July 2020
  • Best/favorite cordless clippers???
    09 July 2020

    Hey everyone!! I'm currently researching cordless clippers, I really want one badly. My boss has a pulse ZR ii and one of my co-workers has an Oster.

    So far I've been looking into the pulse and the Wahl km cordless

    Apparently the pulse is supposed to be the best, super hardy and a workhorse. But at the same time I see reviews that the km is super erganomic and nice, im really unsure.

    Do you guys use a cordless clipper? If so, what kind, and how would you rate it? Thank you so incredibly much

    submitted by /u/dingdangdoongus
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  • Bather bath and groomer trim - tip split?
    09 July 2020

    Do you split the tip 50/50 if the bather does the entire bath (blow dry, ear cleaning, glands, nail trim) and the groomer does a quick trim add on, like a sani trim or rear feather (normally takes 5-10 min)?

    Just wondering how others do it.

    submitted by /u/Duosion
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  • Hair regrowth after surgery and preventing tangles?
    08 July 2020

    I'm just gonna say it... I have a doodle. I know, I know. But even our lovely groomer calls my dog "the unicorn": he is line-brushed every single morning with a grooming rake and stainless steel pet comb, and I use a shedding blade on a weekly basis (along with ear cleaning & nail dremeling). I also brush his teeth daily, if that's any indication of how anal I am about his hygiene lmao.

    Now, I have two questions for you lovely people about coat maintenance... my dog recently had a mass surgically removed so he has to wear a cone to prevent him from licking the sutures. He has also been wearing a cotton body suit to keep the surgery site clean and dry while it recovers. However, I believe that the friction from the cone and the cotton suit has been causing some tangling (particularly around his neck and chest) and it has made our daily grooming take twice as long as usual. That's fine and manageable, but I was wondering if you guys know of any products or tricks to limit this? I'm fine with brushing them out every morning, but I've been wondering if there's a smarter way that I'm missing out on.

    Also, do you have any advice on how to encourage hair regrowth following surgery? The spot where the mass used to be was shaved for surgery, and it's been about two weeks. I've heard that there are many scam "fur regrowth" products out there, but do you guys know of any that actually work? Having the incision site so exposed makes me nervous, and I'd like the fluff to grow back sooner rather than later.

    Thank you guys so much in advance! ❤️

    submitted by /u/rowerbug
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  • Aussie toes are the best toes
    08 July 2020
  • Grinder or Clipper?
    08 July 2020

    Goldendoodle with black nails and long hair on paws. Suggestions?😬

    submitted by /u/Caprilynn
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  • When to stop and say no.
    08 July 2020

    Do you ever have trouble with a difficult dog? I’m usually good and have patience but I have this one dog that lunges or tries to bite me when I try to touch her. Surprisingly, I managed to get her nails and pre shaved and face shaped before her bath! But after her bath she’s realized where she’s at and she’s had enough. I feel bad for cutting her appointment short but I simply cannot pick her up without possibly being bit but my safety and hands mean more to me than getting a dogs hair perfectly cut. It’s not worth the $50. I am going to recommend CBD

    submitted by /u/Sotogirl666
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  • THANK YOU!!!
    08 July 2020

    I just wanted to make a short post, thanking everyone for sharing their experiences on this sub. The only other groomers I know are the ones I see at work daily, or former coworkers, so its great to come here and see that other groomers are dealing with the same bullshit! From the doodle-craze and quarantine shave-downs, to rude customers and biting dogs... I feel less alone!

    17 years ago, my high school friend got me a summer job at the local grooming shop/boarding kennel. I remember her AND my boss both warned me that we were NOT going to playing with the dogs all day and its HARD WORK. I learned pretty quickly how true that was.

    People still say "Wow it must be fun, being around dogs all day!" It can be!! We have a new St. Bernard puppy coming in tomorrow and we are all ecstatic to meet him (his owners have an old St. B who I just adore).

    But as rewarding and as fun as this job can be, it can also break you down- mentally, emotionally and definitely physically. And I don't think most of our customers understand this. This is hard work. Sometimes we leave the shop crying because we know that matted dog we shaved naked, will be back in horrible condition in a year. Sometimes we leave angry, because owners dont fucking understand that ONE SINGLE DOG being obnoxious can throw off our entire schedule. Yes, we were 15 minutes late on your dog, but thats because we were trying to do our job with another dog, without getting bit.

    The one thing I can say is that when my boss' dog lay dying on our grooming shop floor, and we huddle around him saying our goodbyes, we were late on every single dog, those customers were all very understanding us and didnt mind waiting. I just wish they were all like that.

    Now Im rambling. But the point of this post is to thank you all for your support. So... THANK YOU!

    submitted by /u/PepperSnotts
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Australian Dog Blogs

09 July 2020

Australian Dog Blogs
  • Tips for grooming at home
    08 July 2020

    Our tips for grooming your dog at home Regular grooming is vital for dogs of all breeds. It helps them maintain a shiny, tangle-free coat, whilst allowing you to check for any skin issues. Regular grooming can also offer a one-on-one bonding experience between you and your pooch. Find out how to keep your dog […]

    The post Tips for grooming at home appeared first on DOGUE.

  • Tools for home grooming
    08 July 2020

    Our top grooming tools for home care KONG ZoomGroom – suitable for short-haired breeds The KONG ZoomGroom is the best grooming and shampooing brush available. It removes loose hair like a magnet, and it stimulates capillaries and natural oil production for healthy skin and a healthy coat. JW Gripsoft Soft Pin Slicker Brush – suitable […]

    The post Tools for home grooming appeared first on DOGUE.

  • PAWGUST 2020 - Get active with your dogs in August 2020
    08 July 2020
    Dogs helped 80% of Australians stay paw-sitive during Covid restrictions

    But new research from Guide Dogs finds we are failing to reward furry companions with enough walkies.

    2020 hasn’t been a ‘good boy’ so far, and dogs have played a vital role in keeping Aussies smiling during a tough start to the year. But according to new Guide Dogs research, dog owners aren’t repaying the favour and giving man’s best friend the exercise they needed during COVID-19 restrictions.

    The survey [1] of 1,000 dog owners found four out of five Aussies (81%) relied on ‘puppy-love’ for emotional support and a positive frame of mind during the height of the pandemic, however, this wasn’t reciprocated when it came to dog walking.

    Before COVID-19 restrictions, over 70 per cent of owners weren’t walking their dog at least once a day.

    During restrictions this hardly changed and owners admitted to walking their dogs for shorter distances over shorter periods than they usually would.

    Ten per cent didn’t walk their beloved pooches at all.

    The study was conducted as part of PAWGUST, a campaign in its third year that is inviting the public to give back to their dogs who have helped them through COVID-19 by committing to a 30-minutewalk together for 30 days in August. That’s roughly 2km a day and 60km in total - no small feat in the middle of winter!


    Guide Dogs NSW/ACT CEO, Dale Cleaver said: “The lockdown period highlighted an interesting change in dynamic for Aussies and their pets, with many people able to spend quality time with their dog, but also confined to their homes for large parts of their day – something that our pet dogs are all too familiar with.”

    “To reward their furry friends’ companionship in the most valuable way, we’re encouraging dog owners to get out and enjoy a walk together every day in August.”

    The research from Guide Dogs also revealed that if they weren’t man’s best friend before COVID-19 restrictions, they certainly are now, with 70 per cent of respondents reporting feeling closer to their dog as a result of restrictions, and half worried that returning to work might emotionally impact their dogs.

    Dog ownership also spiked with 63 per cent of dog owners saying they know someone who got a new dog during restrictions, and 18 per cent knowing five or more.

    More than half (53%) said they chatted more with other dog owners while walking during restrictions, and 40 per cent increased their dog-related social media activity.


    Dog owners around the country can now give back by signing up to PAWGUST

    By getting friends and family to sponsor them, they will also contribute to raising and training Guide Dogs, which costs roughly $50,000 per dog but provides years of independence and companionship to someone with blindness or low vision.

    “At Guide Dogs we are always grateful to our dogs, and PAWGUST is about encouraging Australians to join us by getting the steps in with their four-legged friend while raising money to help us raise and train more Guide Dogs at the same time,” said Mr Cleaver.

    Australians can sign up for PAWGUST or donate by visiting www.pawgust.com.au/pawsitive

    [1] The research is based on a survey of 1,000 Australian dog owners, conducted via online survey method in June 2020.

    About Pawgust

    Back for its third year, PAWGUST is an initiative from Guide Dogs that is encouraging Australian dog owners to challenge themselves to walk their dogs for thirty minutes a day for thirty days in August to raise vital funds that help to support people living with vision loss and blindness. It costs more than $50,000 to breed, raise and train a Guide Dog or Assistance Dog.

    Register at: https://www.pawgust.com.au/pawsitive

    About Guide Dogs Australia

    Guide Dogs Australia is the trading name of Royal Guide Dogs Australia which is the national organisation comprised of the state and territory-based Guide Dogs organisations across Australia. Together these organisations are the leading providers of both Guide Dogs and orientations and mobility services assisting Australians with blindness or low vision. Their services include mobility training with long canes, Guide Dogs and electronic travel device such as talking GPS technology, to enable people with blindness or low vision to get around their communities independently. 

    Visit www.guidedogsaustralia.com or call 1800 804 805.

    MEDIA RELEASE, 8th July 2020
  • 5 Signs of Excessive Licking in Dogs
    07 July 2020

    Excessive licking can be a symptom of an underlying issue, and it’s important to take note on how much your dog is licking themselves. Is your dog excessively licking?

    The post 5 Signs of Excessive Licking in Dogs appeared first on Paw Life.

  • Win 1 of 3 Pet-Mat Heated Pads for Dogs
    03 July 2020
    Our dogs just like our cat are heat-seeking missiles who usually make a beeline for our bed at night and blankets, heaters or open fires on cold winter days.

    If you have a hairless dog, a puppy, asenior dog suffering from canine arthritis or another medical condition, it's even more essential to keep them warm and comfortable throughout winter.

    A great option is to provide them with their own heated pad like the Original Pet-Mat™ which is using the latest in Positive Temperature Coefficient Technology.

    The Pet-Mat™ is designed to reach a maximum temperature of 40 degrees Celsius whether it is covered or not. In reality, a more practical heat rise of 20-30 degrees Celsius is usually maintained above ambient conditions. 
    Since the Pet-Mat™ works on dynamic heat transfer, it should maintain a temperature slightly warm to the touch until body contact is made. It is simply impossible for it to ever overheat ensuring a consistently comfortable use for your pet, even if left on 24/7.

    To clean your Pet-Mat™ you can wash it under running water or just wipe it off with a damp washer.


    *** Win 1 of 3 Pet-Mat™ Heated Animal Pads ***
    (Small, 1 Medium, 1 LargePrize Pool: $333.50)

    HOW TO ENTER:

    1) Like our post (04/07/20) AND our Facebook page
    2) Like the Pet-Mat Facebook page at www.facebook.com/PetMatAu/ or Instagram page @petmat_au
    3) Comment "how does your dog keep warm in winter?" (photos/videos welcome) via the Australian Dog Lover Facebook page or on Instagram (simply tag us in your post).

    TERMS & CONDITIONS

    1. This Competition will open on Saturday 4th July 2020 (8am) and will close on Sunday 12th July, 2020 (midnight A.E.S.T.). Open to Australian residents only.
    Please allow 2-3 weeks for your prize to be delivered directly from the company.
    2. To Enter, Like our post (04/07/20) + Tell us "how does your dog keep warm in winter?" (photos/videos welcome) via our Australian Dog Lover Facebook page 
    or Instagram @australiandoglover.
    3. This Promotion is a game of skill and chance plays no part in determining the winner.
    The entries will be judged by the Australian Dog Lover team. The winning entries will be selected based on the most creative, informative or useful statement.
    4. Please note you MUST LIKE BOTH our Facebook page and the Pet-Mat:Heated Animal Pads pages to be eligible for a prize.
    5. Entrants in the competition can only enter once.
    6. Prizes not claimed within 48 hours will be redrawn.
    * Entry into the competition is deemed acceptance of all terms and conditions.
  • Local dogs go barking mad for BWS store!
    02 July 2020
    The Geebung BWS is not only a favourite destination for locals, but also their furry friends after the team started serving dog treats and fresh bowls of water - with some naughty pooches refusing to leave until they’ve been served!

    “Customers love coming here and so do their dogs. I reckon it’s the dogs who bring their owners, not the other way around,” said Geebung BWS store manager Kristy Edwards.

    Animal loving Kristy - who has two rescue dogs and fosters a third - decided to buy dog treats as part of a marketing campaign 12 months ago and has kept it up long since the campaign wrapped up.

    The orange water bowl by the store entry is always freshly replenished, and a packet of dog treats is readily available - which has created a very local furry following, with a Bulldog named Sass and a Cocker Spaniel called Evie leading the pack.

    “We have video footage of Evie’s owner having to pull her away from the store entry when we were closed because she was refusing to leave without her treat. Sass just plonks himself down on the ground when he walks past. He patiently waits for me to finish serving customers, so I can give him his treat,” she said.

    Local dogs Ozzie, Myf, Charlie, Richie, Rosie and Evie (lead shot) enjoy socialising at BWS Geebung - Photo: Kristy Edwards

    Kristy estimates that the store has on average at least six furry friends visiting every day.

    “What simply started off as a passion for animals has really turned into quite a following here at Geebung. Our customers and their furry friends really brighten me and my team’s day,” she added.

    Kristy has also rallied the store team and customers to help animals in need by supporting local charities.

    “We are all huge animal lovers and collect blankets, food and towels for those who are less fortunate and struggle to provide for their dogs, as well as for animal rescue and sanctuary Deathrow Unchained. We have customers coming in every week to contribute with pet food, second hand jumpers and blankets. It’s really incredible,” she said.

    “We have also helped raise money for Bikers Against Animal Cruelty and Deathrow Unchained” she added.

    Burbank-based animal rescue Deathrow Unchained Animal Rescue and Sanctuary said they were moved by the support they had received from Kristy and the Geebung community.

    “As an Animal Rescue that relies purely on contributions from the community to keep us going, we were so incredibly touched by the generosity of Kristy from BWS. Kristy often visits our sanctuary and drops off food, vouchers and even blankets for our animals. We are so grateful for her incredible support,” a spokesperson for Deathrow Unchained said.


    Happy furry visitor at BWS -
    Photo: Kristy Edwards
    “She recently kindly provided our Sanctuary with gift vouchers for various stores like Woolworths. This helped us survive through COVID-19 lockdowns while our main source of income completely stopped. We are home to over 14 rescued animals, some from hoarding situations, many from animal abuse,” the spokesperson added.

    Area manager Kelly Kyle from BWS added: “With stores in all major cities, and strong presence in regional and remote locations, BWS is a part of almost every Australian community, and we encourage our store teams to get involved in their local communities and their furry friends.”

    The Geebung store is located on 9/8 Railway Parade, Geebung, 4034, QLD.



    Deathrow Unchained

    Deathrow Unchained Animal Rescue and Sanctuary is based in Burbank, Brisbane. Having saved and incredible 3350 animals in the 4 years they have been operating, they focus on animals with no options and are in desperate need of help. They are currently running small group tours around their Sanctuary to help them recover from the finical toll COVID-19 lockdown took on their organisation. 

    To find out how you can help this great cause visit www.deathrowunchained.org

    About BWS

    Since 2001, BWS have made it their mission to become the most convenient bottle shop in the country. With over 1,300 stores across Australia and a new app (BWS on tAPP), locals can now order ahead for free pick up in store or get drinks delivered ASAP (check BWS’ online store locator for delivery areas). The BWS team is passionate about local and goes to great lengths to curate a range that's tailored to the tastes of the locals, so their customers don't have to – how convenient.

    MEDIA RELEASE, 2nd July 2020
  • Dog Lovers Book Club - July 2020
    30 June 2020
    Nothing beats curling up in front of the fire with a great book and your pets on a cold winter's day! Time to grab that cuppa and enjoy the upcoming school holidays with this July 2020 selection of our Dog Lovers Book Club.

    LOST COMPANIONS
    Reflections on the Death of Pets
    by Jeffrey Moussaieff Masson

    A heartfelt exploration of human grief after the loss of a pet by the New York Times bestselling author of Dogs Never Lie About Love.

    Our society is still learning how to dignify the relationship between a pet and their human with proper mourning rituals. We have only recently allowed the conversation of how to grieve for our non-human family members to come front and centre.

    In examining the special bond between pets and their people, Jeffrey Moussaieff Masson validates the grief that we feel when a special pet dies. Lost Companions is full of poignant stories about dogs, cats, horses, birds, wombats and other animals that beautifully illustrate the strong bond humans form with them. 

    A heartfelt exploration of human grief after the loss of a pet, Lost Companions is a thought-provoking book on pet loss. Masson takes a personal approach, allowing readers to explore their own responses, suggesting ways through and out of grief, as well as meaningful ways to memorialise our best friends.

    Paperback: 272 pages
    Publisher: Murdoch Books, 2nd July 2020

    RRP: $29.99 from all good book stores and online.

    SALO
    Canine Outlaw
    by Nik Forster


    This is the story of Salo, a dingo pup near to death, rescued by David Wiringales, an elderly Aboriginal man who lives a solitary life in the outback. He raises the pup with young ones from his own dog, Tessa. A violent storm from the south disrupts his life and forces his dogs to fend for themselves and commit the unforgivable crime; killing sheep. In no time they have a bounty on their heads.

    The native Aboriginal population welcomed the dingo to their fires, not only did they have them as companions but as a food source and means of warmth at night, at the same time incorporating them into their spiritual lives.

    The large dog, ignorant of his ancestry, made his way through the tangled heath and up onto a small rocky embankment that sloped upward from the dense vegetation. He coughed, as near as a dingo gets to bark, and greeted his mate.

    Book sales help the Bargo Dingo Sanctuary's conservation and breeding programs.

    Paperback, 160 pages
    Publisher: Dandiprawn Productions, 7th April 2020

    Price: $19.95 (special offer) from Forster Books

    WAR DOGS
    by Tony Park (with Shane Bryant)

    In Afghanistan, sometimes all that stands between coalition troops and death or serious injury is a dog.

    Highly trained dogs and their handlers search for improvised explosive devices or hidden weapons out on patrol with combat troops.

    It’s a perilous job, often putting them right in the firing line, and making them high priority targets for the Taliban insurgents they’re fighting.

    Shane Bryant, a former Australian Army dog handler, spent 10 years in Afghanistan working with elite American special forces and training other handlers and dogs. War Dogs is his story – a riveting true account of the hidden war in the mountains and cities of the world’s most dangerous conflict, and the comradeship between man and dog that has saved numerous lives.

    This re-released updated edition of War Dogs looks at the effects a decade of service as a contractor had on Shane, his personal life and his mental health as he faced new enemy, post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Paperback, 304 pages
    Publisher: AJP, 15 July 2020

    RRP: $29.99 (paperback) from Amazon, Dymocks, Booktopia; $10.99 (Kindle edition) at www.tonypark.net

    REALITY BARKS
    by Kit James


    On a hot and dusty day a country mutt is rescued from Barranyup Dog Pound. It’s way out west of Sydney. What happens next is no ordinary tale, and this mutt turns out to be no ordinary dog. Previously a one-man companion dog, he discovers that he’ll now be shared between two slick up-market Sydney couples. A Time Share dog? Oh, really? 

    What’s this all about he wonders? 

    First there’s his new name – Elliott, named after T.S.Eliot, who wrote Cats! Then, because Elliott can read auras and understand every word of human talk, and not just body language, he discovers that none of them really wanted a full-time dog. So why is he here? What’s going on? And who is he supposed to love? He knows who he wants to love, and that’s Adriana. He fell in love with her scent, even before he saw her. That’s the way of dogs.

    But it’s Ad Man Jamie, the human Alpha Male of the other couple, who has secret designs on him. Soon Elliott finds he’s a busy working dog with an action-packed starring role in a TV ad campaign for a yucky dog food brand that he detests.
    Reality Barks.

    He’ll do anything not to be sent back to Barranyup. Elliott knows the fate of ‘boomerang’ dogs. So this clever rescue dog embraces his new life and becomes a celebrity, or as he says, from mutt to megastar.

    What’s a dog like this doing wearing a hat like that? You may well ask. Find out in Reality Barks (Book #1), An Elliott C. Cool Caper series, a collection of amusing heart-warming stories for every dog lover.

    eBook, 287 pages
    Publisher: Kit James Publishing, May 2020

    RRP: $6.99 from www.booktopia.com.au

    BOOK CLUB - KIDS' CORNER

    CAMPING CHAOS! 
    Dog Diaries
    by Steven Butler, James Patterson

    The fifth book in the hilarious Dog Diaries series featuring Rafe Khatchadorian's pet pooch, Junior.

    I can't wait to get to the most magical place in the world – The Woods! Just imagine all the adventures...
    Doggy-paddling in the lake
    Barking at raccoons
    And my quest to find the greatest stick in the universe!

    But all my best plans are ruined when Iona Stricker -the most miserable, cruel, and obedience-loving human you could ever hope not to meet - shows up, making any fun impossible.

    Until... a canine criminal, escaped from Pooch Prison, sneaks into the camp and changes everything!
    This vacation might be fun after all!

    Paperback, 208 pages
    Publisher: Cornerstone, 19th May 2020
    For Ages: 7 - 9 years old

    Price: $13.50 at www.booktopia.com.au

    MR. DOG AND THE RABBIT HABBIT
    by Ben Fogle, Steve Cole, Nikolas Ilic (Illustrator)

    A brand new young fiction series by TV broadcaster and intrepid explorer Ben Fogle, inspired by his real-life animal experiences... 

    Co-written with best-selling children's author Steve Cole and illustrated throughout with beautiful black and white illustrations by Nikolas Ilic.

    You can always count on Mr. Dog to help an animal in trouble...

    When a mother rabbit is captured in a trap, he ends up playing bunnysitter...

    But someone wants to get rid of All the rabbits, not just this one, and time is running out for Mr. Dog to save them...

    Format: Paperback, 144 pages
    Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers, 5th May 2020
    For Ages: 7 - 8 years old

    RRP: $10.61 at www.booktopia.com.au 

    THAT DOG! 
    by Emma Lazell 

    This brilliant second picture book from Emma Lazell - a rising star of the picture-book world - is a hilarious dognapping caper.

    There's a team of dognappers on the loose! They've stolen lots of pooches, but this time they're up against a very clever dog.The cunning Penelope Dognapper is very keen to get her hands on the latest rare breed, the lesser-spotted woofer. Her big mistake is sending Patrick, her accomplice, to do the job. 

    He has great difficulty identifying the right dog-that dog-and in a house that also contains a snake, a tortoise, and a characterful cat, you can imagine the chaos that ensues as he tries to steal the dog.

    And that dog is a very smart woofer. He's a bit of a detective in his spare time, and he might just have worked out who's behind the dastardly crimes. 

    Will he avoid getting caught himself and rescue his fellow creatures? 

    Format: Paperback, 32 pages
    Publisher: Pavilion Books, 20th April 2020
    For Ages: 3+ years old

    RRP: $14.99 from www.booktopia.com.au 

    TOBY THE DOG
    My Furry Foster Family

    by Debbi Michiko Florence, illustrated by Melanie Demmer



    "T" is for Toby, tricks and TROUBLE! 

    Toby the black Labrador might be an older rescue dog, but he's still got enough mischief beneath his collar to keep eight-year-old Kaita Takano and her animal-fostering family on their toes from morning till night. 

    This playfully illustrated, Kaita-narrated chapter book promises plenty of canine fun.

    Paperback, 72 pages
    Publisher: Capstone Global Library Ltd, 28th May 2020

    Price: $17.90 at www.booktopia.com.au
  • Beware Foreign Body Ingestions in your Pets
    30 June 2020
    Ooshie almost cost Coco her life...

    Coco is feeling very sorry for herself following emergency life-saving surgery at Lort Smith Animal Hospital.

    The two-year-old Pinscher cross Doberman had a lion Ooshie and another plastic object removed from her bowel during emergency surgery.

    Coco’s carer Troy Collins had noticed something was not right after his beloved pet began vomiting a lot of plant matter. However it was her loss of appetite that really caught his attention.

    “She refused to eat, which is not like her,” said Mr Collins adding she then “went down really quickly”.

    The family rushed her to a local vet, where x-rays suggested a foreign object was blocking her bowel. She was referred to Lort Smith for emergency enterotomy surgery.


    Mr Collins was surprised to hear it was two pieces of plastic including a lion Ooshie that was causing Coco’s internal damage, suspecting it might have otherwise been Lego.

    “Coco is lucky she made it to us in time. If she had been left in this state much longer the situation could have been dire,” said Lort Smith Head of Hospital Dr David Cunliffe.

    Foreign body surgeries increased by 75% in comparison to last year over the April-May period.


    Lort Smith understands pets are curious, and can easily ingest things while we are not looking. However, it is important to minimise potential hazards by keeping keep enticing objects out of reach.

    Creating physical boundaries around certain activities can help to minimise these unfortunate but increasingly common instances.

    “Most importantly always keep an eye on you dog; and if you are concerned about your pet, please see your vet,” added Dr Cunliffe.

    Coco spent a total of four days at Lort Smith, and is now back at home with her beloved family, feeling rather sorry for herself.

    Lort Smith continues to offer emergency, urgent and essential care to animals.
    At present, Lort Smith’s opening hours are 8:30am-10pm every day of the year.

    About Lort Smith

    Lort Smith is the largest not-for-profit animal hospital in Australia, delivering essential and life-saving services to sick, injured and vulnerable animals. Each year our team of more than 60 vets and 90 nurses provide quality care for around 25,000 animals. Lort Smith rehomes approximately 800 animals each year and operates a number of community outreach programs which have a significant social impact on the community. Lort Smith receives no ongoing government funding.

    For more information, please visit www.lortsmith.com/donate

    MEDIA RELEASE, 30th June 2020


  • How to Care for Senior Dogs
    29 June 2020
    Even though your dog may be slowing down a little, there’s no reason why his later years should not be some of his most rewarding. After all, he’s wiser as well as older, and with regular veterinary attention, daily care and proper nutrition, your senior dog can still experience a very happy, healthy life.

    However, you can’t ignore the fact that your dog’s body condition will change as the years go by. Important bodily functions, normally taken for granted, may start to slow down or malfunction.

    Just like humans, your dog's senses eventually start to deteriorate, leading toimpaired vision, hearing, taste and smell. Appetite may decrease and very old dogs often get thinner, with the shoulders and spine becoming more prominent.

    How old is your dog really?


    Senior dogs have different care requirements than those of a younger dog. This fact probably doesn’t come as a surprise to anyone.

    But how do you know when your dog is considered to be a senior?

    It really depends on the individual dog. In general, giant breed dogs age faster than smaller breed dogs. A Great Dane is considered to be senior by roughly 5-6 years old whereas a Chihuahua would likely only be middle-aged then, and probably not considered a senior until 10-11 years. 

    Large breed dogs fall somewhere in between. A Labrador Retriever might be considered senior by 8-10 years of age. Genetics, nutrition, environment; all of these play a role in how fast your dog ages.

    In addition to a dog's breed, specific lifestyle factors – such as diet, exercise and medical history – affect how long a particular dog will live.


    What are the signs of doggy ageing?

    The most practical way to tell if your dog is growing old is to observe his or her behaviour and appearance. Simply put, how old does your dog act, look, and feel?

    Photo by Michael on Unsplash
    Your dog may develop arthritis or other degenerative diseases that cause him to slow down. He may not be able to walk as far or play as long. He may tire more easily. 

    He may have difficulty getting up or finding a comfortable position to sleep in. He may experience apparent stiffness in the joints and have difficulty getting up after lying down, or after a long walk. He may become reluctant to go up and down stairs or have difficulty getting into and out of the car. He may start losing his balance, stumbling and falling over, which could be a sign of geriatric vestibular disease.

    Senior dogs frequently suffer from kidney disease, liver diseaseheart disease and other conditions that may result in weight loss.

    On the other hand, some senior dogs may have the opposite problem. Some dogs will become less active with age, essentially becoming couch potatoes, and will gain weight as a result.
    Obesity in a major health issue in dogs of all ages and senior dogs are no different.

    Other signs to watch out for include:
    • Thicker, less pliable skin. Rougher and thinner coat, with bald patches or white hairs.
    • Deafness, revealed by a failure to respond to commands or calling their name.
    • Tooth and gum conditions â€“ look out for food being dropped or excessive salivation and pawing at the mouth. Swellings below the eye may be signs of tooth root abscesses and need vet attention.
    • Warts, fatty lumps and even tumours may appear. Check these out with your vet, as early detection may save your dog's life.
    • Excessive thirst and frequent or uncontrolled urination.
    • Confusion or failure to recognise their surroundings
    • Depression, disobedience and occasionally destructive behaviour. These last two could be indicating that your dog suffers from Canine Cognitive Dysfunction (CCD) or dog dementia.
    • A hazy, bluish cast on the eyes, which is normal and usually does not hinder the eyesight. However, the hazy, whitish growth of cataracts can lead to blindness. Your vet can help you distinguish the difference.
    • A tendency to sleep more during the day but sleep less at night. Some dogs may prowl around the house at night because of sore joints, senility or even loneliness.
    The day will come when - like us - you’ll start spotting the signs of old age but that doesn’t mean you have to wrap your dog in cotton wool and start to worry. You just need to adjust your routine and take a few precautions.

    What you can do to help your senior dog:

    1. Daily routine

    A consistent daily routine is important to your older dog's physical, mental and emotional health, providing comfort and a reassuring framework. Dogs that are blind generally cope better if you can keep the layout of furniture and objects in the house and yard the same.

    2. Proper medical care

    Regular check-ups (twice a year) with your veterinarian are a must for older dogs. 

    Before the vet visit, there are a few specific things you can record that will help with diagnosing certain conditions:

    1. Measure average water intake over 24 hours. An intake of 100 mL/kg/hr is considered too much. An excess water intake can be associated with numerous diseases.

    2. Take note of any coughing – what time of day it occurs, if it occurs upon waking or when active. The timing of the cough can help determine the cause of the cough.

    3. Measure the average breathing rate over a minute, while at rest. Lung and heart disease can cause an increased breathing rate.

    4. Note any slowness to rise in the mornings, difficulty with jumping or climbing, slowing down on walks, or limping.

    5. Note all lumps and bumps, how long they have been there and if they have changed in size.

    6. Note any other changes, particularly: a decrease in weight or muscle condition, changes in appetite (decrease or increase), increased weeing, changes to the stools, bad breath, drooling, disorientation, and confusion.

    Regular blood and urine screening tests can detect the early onset of diseases that are not obvious from physical examination, such as kidney, liver, and hormonal diseases. Ideally, do not feed your dog for 12 hours prior to the blood test. Also, bring in a first morning urine sample with you from the same day as the vet visit.

    A specific note on anaesthesia:

    Elderly pets quite commonly present to veterinary clinics with multiple diseases. A common scenario is the obese dog with severe dental disease, skin lumps, and arthritis. They may also have heart, lung, and/or early kidney disease. For these reasons, many owners become concerned about putting their dog under anaesthesia to fix the teeth or remove skin lumps. 

    But just because a dog is old does not mean they cannot have an anaesthetic. This is a discussion to be had with your vet: the risks versus the benefits. Many elderly dogs have a new lease on life when their severe dental disease is treated. I know I would be grumpy if I were living with a constant tooth ache!

    Just because a dog is old does not mean they have to suffer in silence. There are treatments for helping with arthritis, dementia, chronic pain, and many other elderly pet diseases. Seek advice from your vet.

    3. Keep exercising your senior dog 

    It can help keep your older dog lean and maintain healthy joints and muscles. Remember to tailor your dog’s exercise needs to his age and individual requirements. 
    If you dog has arthritis, regular, short gentle exercise is important to keep the joints lubricated and mobile. Use your dog as a guide. If they pull up lame or stiff after the walk, shorten the walk the next day.

    If your senior is not used to exercise, start slow and gradually increase the intensity â€” and only after you’ve consulted a veterinarian. Also, be careful with short-nosed dogs on hot days as they're prone to heat stress.

    Also don't forget to check your dog's nails. Elderly dogs don't always wear down their nails as well as younger active dogs and may require more regular nail trims.

    4. Feed your older dog a high-quality diet

    In general, dogs of seven years and older start taking life a bit easier and, as a result, their nutritional needs start to change once more. Senior dogs are less active and have a slower metabolism, so fewer calories are required
    But high-quality, easy-to-digest protein becomes more important than ever, to help maintain overall body condition.

    Also, learn to read the dog food label and choose a diet that is appropriate for your dog’s age and lifestyle. You should feed your dog once or twice a day, but you may find your older dog prefers to eat smaller meals more frequently. This is quite normal, as it’s easier to digest several small meals than a few large ones.

    5. Keep your senior dog at his ideal body weight
    • Overweight dogs have a higher incidence of diseases such as diabetesheart disease, skin disease, even cancer. Obesity also significantly worsens arthritis. Weight loss is the single most important thing that can improve quality of life in large obese dogs suffering from arthritis. Your veterinarian can help you choose an appropriate diet for your dog, especially since overweight dogs must be fed carefully to ensure that all nutrient needs are met while still allowing for weight loss.

    • Consider fortifying your senior dog’s diet with fatty acids such as DHA and EPA (fish oil). They have been shown to be useful for dogs with mobility issues due to arthritis or other joint diseases. 

    • Nutraceuticals containing EpitalisGreen-lipped Mussel, Glucosamine, Chondroitin, can also be beneficial for senior dogs. Look for a nutritional supplement that is backed by clinical trials.

    • Consider a special diet if your older dog has heart or kidney disease. For example, diets lower in sodium are sometimes advocated for dogs with heart disease, while diets which help control protein, phosphorus, calcium and other electrolyte levels are given to dogs with kidney disease. Your veterinarian can help you choose the best food for your dog based on your dog’s individual situation.

    6. Healthy teeth and gums


    Routine dental care from your vet is very important, as older dogs are more prone to gum disease and tartar build-up. 

    In addition to regular visits to a professional, it's always a good idea for you to check your dog's teeth and gums regularly.

    Brushing your dog’s teeth may seem like a silly idea but it can help keep your dog’s mouth healthy. If you cannot brush, consider dental treats and use a dental chew toy that helps keep the teeth clean.



    7. Provide plenty of toys to keep your senior dog occupied (canine enrichment is beneficial to dogs of all ages). Food puzzles are not only useful for entertainment but for weight loss purposes as well.

    8. Provide your older dog with special accommodations  

    For instance, dogs with arthritis might benefit from soft bedding in the form of an orthopedic dog bed or towels/blankets on which to sleep. Ramps can be used to make stairs easier to navigate if they cannot be avoided. 

    Even providing carpeting or rugs over hard-surface flooring or anti-slip dog socks can help your arthritic dog gain his footing and make it easier for him to get around.

    9. Emotional support
    Try to be sensitive to what your older dog is going through and understand that a lot of psychological changes are taking place. Instead of letting it worry you or deter you from adopting a senior dog, use it as a reminder to live in the moment.

    Daily care of your older dog requires a little more patience on your part. Your loving care and commitment really helps create true quality of life during these senior years.

    We'd like to thank Dr. Meredith Crowhurst for her invaluable contribution to this article.

    About Dr. Meredith Crowhurst

    Dr Meredith Crowhurst is a Melbourne-based locum veterinarian. A Melbourne University graduate with more than a decade of experience, she has extensive consultation and surgical experience and has worked with dogs, cats, rabbits, guinea pigs, rats, mice, birds, and various other animals.

    Meredith understands the importance of the human-animal bond. Her aim is to treat pets and their owners with empathy and compassion, delivering the best standard of care.

    Previously, Meredith completed a Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Science degree and completed her PhD in the biomedical sciences. As well as treating animals, Meredith’s aim is to educate and make medical science knowledge accessible for all

    You can contact her at www.empathichealthwriting.com.au/ and follow her on Instagram at instagram.com/drmerryoliveveterinarian
  • Australian Allstars Trick Training Workshop - July 26
    29 June 2020
    Teaching your dog tricks is not a new thing, many of us have enjoyed teaching our dogs to shake, rollover and beg. However what you may not know is that Trick Training is also a recognised sport.

    The American Kennel Club (AKC) has recognised Trick Training for several years, and has a well established process for dogs to gain their titles, as well as individuals to gain qualifications to be able to assess dogs for these titles.

    The Do More With Your Dog (DMWYD) program developed by stunt performer Kyra Sundance, works closely with the AKC to train and certify individuals as instructors, so they can then go on to train and assess dogs and submit their results for their official AKC title. 

    On 1st of January 2020, the Australian National Kennel Council (ANKC) introduced Trick Dog as a recognised discipline.

    Hugo, Belgian Tervuren recently gained
    his Intermediate Title -Photo: Jess Fynnmore

    The NSW first training workshop was held in December 2019 and attended by Trick Dog sub-committee members and many keen Dogs NSW members. 

    The first competition (trial) was held the following month, and attendees had the chance to be assessed four times. Many gained their Starter Trick Title at this trial, as three passes are needed.

    Unfortunately the COVID-19 lockdown did put a hold on this exciting new discipline in early 2020, but many participants remained excited and wanting to learn more. 


    The Australian Allstars Trick Training Facebook Group
    Amy Curran was already aware of the DMWYD program offered in the United States but didn’t have the spare time to investigate further whilst actively showing her dogs.

    After a rigorous online course which included a multiple choice exam, a written assessment, and several video submissions of myself teaching others and my own dogs, she gained her Certified Trick Dog Instructor (CTDI) qualification. 

    She soon started the ‘Australian Allstars Trick Training’ Facebook Group, which now has close to 500 active members and close to 200 DMWYD Trick Titles have been awarded

    Members have loved being able to train their dogs during this time, and receive help and encouragement from others. 

    All breeds of dog are welcome to join in, at all levels of training.

    The first level ‘Novice’ incorporates basic commands such as watch, sit, stay and walk on a loose leash so it’s the perfect start point for any dog, even those with no training at all. 

    As restrictions started to ease, an in-person workshop was requested. With the help of Caron McGregor and Andrew Morrison of Nireno Pembroke Corgis, Amy Curran set out to organise and conduct the first privately run workshop for this new discipline. The numbers were capped at ten dogs, to allow individual attention for dogs and their owners, and the workshop was booked out within 48 hours. 

    Attendees came from all directions, even from interstate, and all had a fantastic time learning new tricks, gaining awards and enjoying the spit roast lunch! Requests are rushing in daily for the next one!

    Planning is underway and for the next event to be held on Saturday 26th July 2020, at Black Springs in NSW. 

    So what are you waiting for? Start doing more with your dog under the guidance of CTDI Amy Curran by joining the Facebook group ‘Australian Allstars Trick Training’!

    Lead Photo: Debbie Russell's Shelties enjoying their Trick Training sessions.
    MEDIA RELEASE, 26th June 2020
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