nutrition blogs

05 July 2020

nutrition blogs
  • Healthy Orangesicle Pops (Vegan, Gluten-Free)
    05 July 2020

    You can make the freshest, healthiest popsicles EVER by doing it yourself at home. Plus, you can save tons of money, and have healthy snacks for the whole family to enjoy at your fingertips–literally. This zero-added sugar, fruit-rich plant-based (vegan) version of orangesicles is a great way to get started. Whip up a batch in just 10 minutes, then freeze them and enjoy these sweet, citrus-rific popsicles all week long. These Healthy Orangesicle Pops are great for parties too!

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    Healthy Orangesicle Pops (Vegan, Gluten-Free)


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    • Author: The Plant-Powered Dietitian
    • Prep Time: 10 minutes
    • Total Time: 10 minutes
    • Yield: 12 servings
    • Diet: Vegan
    Description

    Make these fresh, healthy, plant-based orangesicle pops in just 10 minutes.

    Ingredients
    Instructions
    1. Zest the orange peels and place in the container of a blender. Peel the oranges, and place the orange flesh into the blender container.
    2. Place bananas in blender container.
    3. Add vanilla, plant-based milk, and orange juice.
    4. Process until smooth and creamy, for just a few seconds.
    5. Pour into popsicle freezer containers. Add lid. Freeze for several hours until firm.
    6. Makes 12 popsicles.
    • Category: Dessert
    • Cuisine: American
    Nutrition
    • Serving Size: 1 serving
    • Calories: 49
    • Sugar: 5 g
    • Sodium: 8 mg
    • Fat: 1 g
    • Saturated Fat: 0 g
    • Carbohydrates: 11 g
    • Fiber: 1 g
    • Protein: 1 g

    Keywords: vegan dessert, frozen treat, frozen dessert

    Did you make this recipe?

    Tag @sharonpalmerrd on Instagram

    For other delicious plant-based desserts, try:

    Easy Chocolate Chia Pudding with Strawberries
    Super Acai Berry Bowl
    Chocolate Sundae Vanilla Cream

    This post may contain affiliate links. For more information, click here.

  • Immune boosting vegetable miso buckwheat soup
    05 July 2020

    Soup season is one of my favourites (bar the cold weather that comes with it though – that’s the only catch!) because it’s incredibly easy to pack so many vegetables and nutrients into a meal without thinking too much about it – my Immune Boosting Vege Miso Buckwheat Soup is case in point – enjoy and stay well my friends.

    IMMUNE BOOSTING VEGETABLE MISO BUCKWHEAT SOUP 

    Serves 4

    Gluten free : Dairy Free : Vegan 

     

    1 tablespoon (20ml) extra virgin olive oil

    2 cloves garlic, peeled and finely sliced 

    1 ½ tablespoons freshly grated ginger

    1 medium (130g) carrot, diced

    1 medium (600g) sweet potato, peeled and diced

    2 cobs fresh corn, approximately 2 cups kernels

    ½ cup (10g) dried shiitake mushrooms 

    ½ cup buckwheat groats

    1.5L vegetable stock

    2 tablespoons white miso paste 

    2 cups (260g) frozen soy beans (edamame)

    2 asian shallots/spring onions, finely sliced lengthwise

    Opt: hemp seeds and tamari almonds to serve

     

    Heat a large stock pot over medium and add extra virgin olive oil, garlic and ginger and cook stirring for about 1-2 minutes. Add carrot and sweet potato, stir, cover and cook with the lid on for about 8 minutes, stirring frequently. Add corn, dried shiitake, buckwheat, stock and and additional 2 cups (500ml) water, bring to the boil, add miso paste then reduce heat to simmer for approximately 25-30 minutes. Stir in edamame and cook a further 5 minutes, then serve topped with asian shallots, hemp seeds and tamari almonds (if available).

     

  • My Take on Avocado Oil
    05 July 2020

    What's my take on avocado oil? This is one of the most frequently asked questions I get. Understandably, it's hard for some people to determine whether or not it's a healthy fat, and also whether or not to us it or to cook with it. And, for as long as this product has been available, I have held an unpopular ...

    The post My Take on Avocado Oil appeared first on Balanced Bites Wholesome Foods.

  • Fresh Melon and Sugar Snap Pea Salad
    05 July 2020
    This incredibly delicious sugar snap pea salad features cantaloupe, goat cheese, slivered almonds, and a simple honey lemon dressing. It’s a refreshing, no cook recipe for any summer evening. I’m having so much fun with my vegetable garden this year! (Check out my garden diary to see what I’m...
  • Save Time with These 8 Make-Ahead Meal Ideas
    05 July 2020
    Here’s how an hour or two of food prep on the weekend can help you put together healthier meals for the entire week. Make-ahead food ideas help me stay organized, save time and always provide something healthy and delicious for when I’m hungry. I like to spend an hour or two on the weekend...
  • Chocolate Tahini Bliss Balls
    05 July 2020
    Chocolatey enough to satisfy your sweet tooth, but wholesome and balanced enough for a great snack or dessert.The post Chocolate Tahini Bliss Balls appeared first on The Crooked Carrot.
  • *Home Page Test
    05 July 2020
    The post *Home Page Test appeared first on Mediterranean Living.
  • Spicy Herb Avocado Dip | Easy And Healthy Recipes
    05 July 2020
    Bright and refreshing, this Avocado Dip or Chutney is infused with the aromatic scent of cilantro and mint. It’s creamy, spicy, tangy and will incite double-dipping. Accompany with your favourite local seasonal veggies and crackers to create a show-stopping platter. Easy, healthy and done in the...
  • Favorite ‘Must Haves’
    05 July 2020
    Here is a list of some of my favorite things from books to snacks to home-workout equipment! Books Intuitive Eating: This book is life changing! If you are interested in ditching dieting for good and finding food freedom + body... Continue reading →
  • Back to Basics
    05 July 2020
    While 2020 has forced many unexpected experiences upon us all, I am finally starting to feel like I might be ready to think about moving forward – slowly and cautiously. For the last three months I feel like I have been in survival mode, but with the passing of the initial shocks and resultant...
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health blogs

05 July 2020

health blogs
  • Kevin Clifton admits he’s ‘jealous’ of girlfriend Stacey Dooley being back at work
    05 July 2020

    Kevin Clifton has admitted that he is ‘jealous’ of his girlfriend Stacey Dooley as she has gone back to work amid the easing of the coronavirus restrictions.

    The professional dancer, 37, also revealed that he’s ‘starting to get really fed up now’ and is ‘itching’ to get back to his own busy schedule.

    Talking on his podcast, Kevin explained how he’s been spending much of lockdown on his ‘PlayStation and watching Netflix‘ and is now ‘the least fit I’ve ever been’.

    ‘Jealous’: Kevin Clifton, 37, has admitted that he is ‘jealous’ of his girlfriend Stacey Dooley, 33, as she has gone back to work amid the easing of the coronavirus restrictions

    He said: ‘This last month, I’ve started to get an itching to get back to work, and my girlfriend is back at work.

    ‘I’m getting jealous of that. I’m starting to get really fed up now. It’s been an excuse to sit and play my ­PlayStation and just watch Netflix, but now I wish I could be performing. I think this is the least fit I’ve ever been right now.’

    Kevin and Stacey started dating after she starred on Strictly Come Dancing in 2018. The pair were crowned champions and became a couple in April 2019.

    The dancer recently revealed that he was so desperate to be paired with eventual winner Stacey, he called in a favour with one of the choreographers. 

    Couple: While Stacey’s job could resume as restrictions eased, Kevin has been spending his time in lockdown on his ‘PlayStation and watching Netflix’ (pictured on the show in 2018) 

    Speaking on The Kevin Clifton Show podcast he revealed he asked Strictly choreographer Jason Gilkison, who he worked with on the Burn The Floor tour, for a hand. 

    While last month Kevin admitted he fears for Stacey’s life when she is working on her TV documentaries.

    The dancer thinks his girlfriend is ‘very brave’ but confessed he still worries when she travels to dangerous territories to film her BBC shows.

    He said: ‘She’s very brave. All I can say to her is just, “Please be careful. Don’t go too far to get some conversation you want or something. It’s not worth it. Just come back to me in one piece.”‘

    Stacey began her career in 2008 when she appeared in documentary Blood, Sweat and T-Shirts, and went on to land her own show Stacey Dooley Investigates the following year.

    In 2019, Stacey travelled to Syria to meet Islamic State brides and she has also been to Nigeria to visit would-be suicide bombers who escaped Boko Haram.

    Sensational: Kevin and Stacey were crowned Strictly champions in 2018 after winning viewers’ hearts with their incredible partnership

    The post Kevin Clifton admits he’s ‘jealous’ of girlfriend Stacey Dooley being back at work appeared first on Sound Health and Lasting Wealth.

  • Trump predicts COVID-19 vaccine or therapeutic will be available ‘long before the end of the year’
    05 July 2020

    President Trump on Saturday said it was ‘likely’ that either a vaccine or a therapeutic to treat patients infected with the coronavirus would be available ‘long before the end of the year.’

    ‘I want to send our thanks to the scientists and researchers around the country and even around the world who are at the forefront of our historic effort to rapidly develop and deliver life-saving treatments and ultimately a vaccine,’ the president said at the second annual July 4th Salute to America event at the White House on Saturday.

    ‘We are unleashing our nation’s scientific brilliance and we’ll likely have a therapeutic and/or vaccine solution long before the end of the year.’

    But a member of Trump’s coronavirus task force declined to endorse the president’s prediction on Sunday.

    ‘I can’t predict when a vaccine will be available,’ Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Dr. Stephen Hahn told ABC’s This Week.

    ‘Yes, we are seeing unprecedented speed for the development of a vaccine.

    President Trump (seen above on the South Lawn of the White House on Saturday) said that either a vaccine or a therapeutic to treat COVID-19 will be available ‘long before the end of the year’

    A nurse poses with a nasal swab at JFK International Airports Terminal 4 XpresCheck, the first airport-based COVID-19 testing facility in the United States, last week

    ‘But as you know … we issued guidance this past week about vaccine development, because we want to be very clear: our solemn promise to the American people is that we will make a decision based upon the data and science on a vaccine, with respect to the safety and effectiveness of that vaccine.’

    ‘When those data become available, and I hope those data are available sooner rather than later, we will make that judgment based upon those data and that science,’ Hahn said.

    On Thursday, Hahn told ABC News that the US may not see a coronavirus vaccine finish development until next year.

    ‘We are on target to reach a vaccine by years end or early next year,’ Hahn told Good Morning America on Thursday. 

    ‘So, I’m cautiously optimistic.’ 

    The nation’s top infectious disease expert, Dr. Anthony Fauci, said this week that COVID-19 vaccine candidates will enter late-stage clinical studies by the end of the month, with others beginning in August, September and October.

    The news comes as Moderna Inc, which is at the forefront of the country’s vaccine development efforts, reiterated earlier in the day that a late-stage trial with 30,000 volunteers would begin this month. 

    ‘We may be able to at least know whether we are dealing with a safe and effective vaccine by the early winter, late winter, (or) beginning of 2021,’ Fauci, head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said in an interview to JAMA Network.

    ‘Multiple (vaccine) candidates are at different stages of development,’ Fauci said.

    ‘We are hopeful that one or more of them may actually show a good degree of safety…and efficacy.’ 

    But Dr. Stephen Hahn, the director of the Food and Drug Administration, declined to back up Trump’s claim during an interview on television on Sunday

    On Thursday, Dr. Francis Collins, the director of the US National Institutes of Health, said the Trump administration’s vaccine-acceleration program could generate a safe and effective COVID-19 vaccine by year-end.

    Companies including Pfizer and AstraZeneca are racing to develop a vaccine for COVID-19, the illness caused by the new coronavirus that has killed more than 531,000 worldwide, according to a Johns Hopkins University & Medicine tally.

    Typical vaccine development can take as long as a decade. 

    But a vaccine is the best hope to stop the ever-climbing coronavirus death toll, so countries, companies and scientists the world-over have been racing to trim the timeline to a year, or less. 

    Globally, there are more than 145 potential vaccines in development. 

    About 10 vaccines are underway in the US, and several US companies have partnered with international firms or universities. 

    The WHO considers the vaccine developed by Oxford University with AstraZeneca the leader of the pack, but the agency’s chief scientist said that Moderna’s is close behind.  

    Moderna’s is considered the lead candidate vaccine in the US, both in terms of timeline and promising earlier trial results 

    Moderna’s vaccine was meant to enter phase 3 trials to test its safety and efficacy in humans next week, but the trial will be delayed due to changes to the study plan, starting instead by the end of the month, the company said on Thursday 

    ‘The furthest along in US testing is an experimental vaccine from NIH’s vaccine research center in partnership with Moderna,’ Collins said at Senate Appropriations hearing earlier on Thursday.

    ‘This month we’ll seek to enroll 30,000 volunteers with results expected in a few months.’

    The US has dipped under 50,000 new daily infections for the first time in four days, according to a tally by Johns Hopkins University, but experts fear celebrations for the July 4th weekend will act like rocket fuel for the nation’s surging coronavirus outbreak.

    Johns Hopkins on Sunday counted 45,300 new coronavirus infections reported Saturday in the US after three days in which the daily count reached as high as 54,500 new cases. 

    The lower figure does not mean the situation in the US is improving, it could be due to reduced reporting on a national holiday.

    The US has the most infections and virus-related deaths in the world, with 2.8 million cases and nearly 130,000 dead, according to the university. 

    Experts say the true toll of the pandemic is significantly higher, due to people who died before they were tested and missed mild cases.

    To show just how steep the US infection curve is, authorities were reporting under 20,000 new infections a day as recently as June 15. 

    On Saturday, Florida and Texas reported more record daily increases in confirmed cases and virus-related deaths have begun to rise.

    Despite warnings by health experts to limit gatherings, Trump went ahead with a speech at Mount Rushmore in South Dakota on Friday and an evening of tribute and fireworks Saturday on the National Mall in Washington.

    ‘We got hit by the virus that came from China,’ the president said on Saturday.

    ‘And we’ve made a lot of progress, our strategy is moving along well. 

    ‘It goes out in one area and rears back its ugly face in another area. 

    ‘But we’ve learned a lot. We’ve learned how to put out the flame.’

    Trump said that the US has tested ‘almost 40 million people’ and that the increased testing explains the rise in the number of cases.

    Pat Lee of Upper Dublin, Pennsylvania, and two friends, none in masks, gathered near the event in Washington.

    ‘POTUS said it would go away,’ Lee said of the pandemic, using an acronym for president of the United States. 

    ‘Masks, I think, are like a hoax.’

    In another worrying sign, the World Health Organization said member states reported more than 212,000 confirmed cases of COVID-19 around the world on Saturday, the highest single-day increase since the start of the pandemic. 

    The Geneva-based organization said more than 60 per cent of the confirmed cases reports it received were in the Americas, which includes the US and Brazil.

    Faced with rising infections, many US communities canceled parades and fireworks and cautioned people against hosting large gatherings.

    Texas, which reported a record daily increase of 8,258 confirmed coronavirus cases Saturday, is retreating from what had been one of the country’s swiftest reopenings.

    Much of the state began mandating face coverings Friday, with a $250 fine for scofflaws.

    In Florida, which reported 11,445 confirmed infections on Saturday, bars statewide are shut down and some regional attractions, such as Zoo Miami and Jungle Island, have closed. 

    Officials in South Florida – including in Miami-Dade County and the Florida Keys – also closed beaches through the weekend.

    Other beaches remained open. 

    At St. Pete Beach on the Gulf of Mexico, parking spaces were scarce and hundreds clustered under umbrellas and in cabanas on the sand. 

    Keisha Pereira came to the beach from Osceola County – more than 100 miles inland – with her daughter and two other children.

    ‘We’re going to stay with each other,’ she said. ‘I feel pretty safe outside.’

    The holiday weekend coincided with a big step back this week for California’s efforts to reopen the state’s economy. 

    A police officer walks away from local residents protesting closed beaches on the 4th of July in Galveston, Texas, on Saturday

    Governor Gavin Newsom ordered a three-week closure of bars and many indoor establishments in counties where some 30 million people live.

    In several California regions, economic woes prompted campaigns to convince state residents to travel within its borders.

    But public health experts and mayors of popular beach towns Santa Cruz and Half Moon Bay pleaded with people to stay home for the holiday.

    Crista Luedtke said demand has been ‘bonkers’ since reopening the 14-room Boon Hotel and Spa that she owns in the Sonoma County town of Guerneville. 

    Guests must stay at least two nights and are assigned lounges near the pool.

    ‘Tourism is not dangerous,’ Luedtke said. 

    ‘I think people not following the rules is dangerous.’   

    The post Trump predicts COVID-19 vaccine or therapeutic will be available ‘long before the end of the year’ appeared first on Sound Health and Lasting Wealth.

  • Prince Harry postpones Invictus Games Dusseldorf to give competitors ‘time to practice and prepare’
    05 July 2020

    The CEO of Prince Harry‘s Invictus Games Foundation has revealed the Düsseldorf contest has been postponed to givecompetitors ‘time to prepare’ after the coronavirus pandemic.  

    In March, organisers said the competition founded by Prince Harry – due to take place at The Hague this year – was likely to be rescheduled to May or June 2021 because of the global crisis. 

    And in a statement released on Twitter this week, they said the Invictus Games Düsseldorf competition, which was due to take place in 2022, has now also been pushed back by a year.

    Dominic Reid, CEO of The Invictus Games Foundation, said: ‘It’s extremely complex to be planning not one, but two multi-national sporting events in the middle of a pandemic, and the Invictus Games Foundation is grateful to the Organising Committee in Germany for their flexibility and hard work in responding to the challenges.’ 

    The Invictus Games, founded by Prince Harry, 35, has delayed the Düsseldorf contest till 2023 amid the coronavirus pandemic (pictured, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex at the Sydney Games in 2018) 

    Prince Harry’s Invictus Games Foundation announced the news on social media, with the CEO calling it ‘extremely complex’ to plan ‘two multi-national sporting events in the middle of a pandemic’

    A statement released online read: ‘In close coordination with the Invictus Games Foundation, the German Organising Committee have decided to reschedule the event due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, to accommodate the rescheduled Invictus Games The Hague which will now take place in 2021.

    ‘It will thus be possible to maintain the two-year Invictus Games cycle and give the competitors and their friends and families the time they need for practice and preparation between the two events.’

    Meanwhile, Dominic said that moving the contest ‘allows the competitors and their team managers time to plan their recovery pathways following the move of The Invictus Games The Hague to next year.’   

    The move to delay the competition comes weeks after the Duke  said the ‘Invictus spirit’ was ‘even more relevant’ amid the Covid-19 pandemic as ‘we address new challenges and adapt our lives’ during a webinar with organisers. 

    The Duke of Sussex announced the Düsseldorf  2022 contest in January this year, shortly after selecting the British team for the 2020 contest in the Hague 

    Prince Harry shared a message with Invictus Games organisers for the meeting, with a video clip released on the charity’s YouTube page.

    The royal, who is currently isolating in Tyler Perry’s $18 million mansion in Los Angeles having stepped back from royal duty, told organisers: ‘This conversation is all about sharing the Invictus spirit and it is even more relevant now as we are having to address new challenges and adapt our lives.’

    The video clip was released days after it was revealed that Prince Harry has merged The Endeavour Fund and the Invictus Games so that he could continue working on them following his decision to step back as a senior royal. 

    At the start of the virtual meeting, which took place in May, Prince Harry told those attending: ‘Hello everybody, I’m really happy to be able to welcome you all here today for the first ever Invictus Games foundation conversation. 

    Last month, Prince Harry said he believes the ‘Invictus spirit’ is ‘more relevant’ than ever in a YouTube video for the organisation 

    ‘We’re obviously not in the Hague but I’m so pleased we have been able to organise this virtual gathering when the Games would have taken place themselves.’

    He went on: ‘This conversation is all about sharing the Invictus spirit and it is even more relevant now as we are having to address new challenges and adapt our lives.’

    ‘I hope that all the nations, competitors and family and friends are coping well to support each other during this time and I know you’ll be showing that resilience that is so central to the Invictus community,’

    He added: ‘I’m very grateful to all of you for being here and showing your support, specifically the speakers and panelists for sharing their experiences.’

    The royal shared the video message with the organisation after the 2020 competition in The Hague was postponed due to the pandemic 

    ‘I hope this conversation will be the first of many, and I am really looking forward to a time when we can come together again. Thank you very much.’ 

    Harry was inspired to found the global tournament after attending the Warrior Games in Colorado in 2013.

    At the event he saw how injured American military personnel thrived on the challenge of taking part in competitive sports that aided their recovery.

    He went on to stage the inaugural games in London’s Olympic Park in 2014, followed by Orlando in 2016, Toronto in 2017 and Sydney in 2018.

    Last year, the Duke met with team members for the Hague 2020 contest, which has since been postponed to 2021

    It emerged last month that the organisation had merged with the Endeavour Fund.

     Taking to Twitter, @WeAreInvictus penned: ‘The Invictus Games Foundation is delighted to announce that the Endeavour Fund has been transferred across from The Royal Foundation and into the work of the Invictus Games Foundation. 

    ‘The Endeavour Fund will continue to support the ambitions of wounded, injured and sick service personnel and veterans but will now expand its activities across the international Invictus community.’

    The royal founded the organisation in 2014 and it has remained close to his heart ever since, choosing the 2017 event as his first public appearance with Meghan

    The Duke of Sussex established The Endeavour Fund in 2012 when he was patron of The Royal Foundation – alongside brother Prince William and Kate Middleton.

    Last year, Prince Harry and Meghan Markle announced they were splitting from The Royal Foundation as the two couples started to take ‘divergent paths’ in their charity work and needed to reflect that in different outlets, a source told PEOPLE.

    Following Megxit, it was decided that Prince Harry will no longer use HRH or his honorary military titles.  

    The post Prince Harry postpones Invictus Games Dusseldorf to give competitors ‘time to practice and prepare’ appeared first on Sound Health and Lasting Wealth.

  • UK Government ‘panic bought’ £13.4million worth of Roche’s coronavirus antibody tests
    05 July 2020

    The Department of Health has been accused of ‘panic buying’ coronavirus antibody tests from the pharmaceutical company Roche before publicly revealing their accuracy.

    Officials spent £13.46million on the blood tests — now being used to tell which NHS staff have already had Covid-19 — on May 15, government contracts show.

    But Public Health England had not officially evaluated any other companies’ tests before it agreed to buy Roche’s, so didn’t know how good they were in comparison.

    The Roche purchase was 10 days after scientists at PHE’s Porton Down laboratory first started looking at the tests but three days before their report was released.

    Results of PHE’s tests were leaked to the press on May 13 and reports claimed it had achieved 100 per cent accuracy in the evaluations.

    But this later turned out to be on only one of two measures and health chiefs actually deemed the test to be 84 per cent sensitive, meaning it could correctly detect past infection in around eight in 10 people. 

    In later evaluations other tests performed better than Roche’s but contracts were not announced for those. Ones made by Abbott Laboratories, which were 94 per cent accurate, were bought in the same week in May for an undisclosed price. 

    Another made by the German firm Siemens last month achieved 86 per cent sensitivity in PHE’s evaluation. These were bought by officials but to no fanfare.

    There was a prior understanding between Roche and the Government that its tests – which were the first to be evaluated – would be bought if PHE approved of them, MailOnline understands. 

    Professor Jon Deeks, a University of Birmingham testing expert who last week published a prestigious 300-page review of Covid-19 antibody testing so far, told MailOnline that PHE appeared to be facing ‘pressure’ to approve the test. He said the Government was ‘panic buying not following the science’.

    The days between PHE looking at the tests and buying them left no time for independent scientists to check what officials were doing, Professor Deeks said.

    And the purchase – which came after Roche was awarded a £21million swab testing contract in March – made it look as though the Swiss firm’s tests had be ‘pre-selected’ by UK officials, Professor Deeks added.

    The Department of Health insists the entire process was ‘standard practice’. 

    It comes amid a string of missteps in the UK’s attempt to get hold of the antibody tests, which has seen it cancel £70million worth of orders for tests that turned out to be no good, and left unable to send back a further £20million worth from China. 

    And a MailOnline investigation revealed in June that a test being used by PHE for its population testing misses up to a third of cases.

    Roche’s Elecsys Covid-19 antibody test is being used for NHS staff and care workers to work out who has had the disease already, but it is not the best performing test Public Health England has evaluated

    Government documents show that Roche was given a contract to supply PHE with antibody tests on May 15, with the deal starting on May 18 and lasting for six months.

    PHE is officially listed as the body that awarded the contract but the decision was actually taken by ministers in the Department of Health. 

    The £13.4m contract was a direct award meaning Roche, a Swiss company, did not have to pitch its products against others so PHE could decide which was best.

    Roche had also been given a contract in March, worth a further £21million, to provide swab tests for the Department of Health.

    And the company’s CEO, Severin Schwan, had laid the groundwork for Roche’s antibody test in April when he announced it was in development and said of other companies’ products: ‘I can tell you, it’s a disaster… These tests are not worth anything. Or have very little use.’

    The timing of the antibody tests contract has raised concerns because PHE agreed to buy the tests three days before it publicly revealed the results of its evaluation, on May 18 – 11 days after it first took delivery of Roche’s kit on May 4.

    Professor Deeks, a biostatistician at the University of Birmingham, told MailOnline: ‘This is not normal.

    ‘There was no time for any scientific scrutiny of the results, and this was the first time PHE had done an evaluation of a Covid-19 antibody test like this. 

    ‘There was certainly no time for independent review of their report or findings.’

    Government contract information shows PHE bought the tests three days before publishing its report of how well they performed, which came on May 18

    Professor Deeks said PHE appeared to have to ‘rush to finalise their reports to get them out,’ adding: ‘It seems likely that there was pressure to get a contract signed as fast as possible.’ 

    Professor Sheila Bird, a biostatistician at the University of Cambridge, added: ‘Everything in a pandemic with high a R [rate] and worrying lethality is rushed’.  

    A second deal was announced in the same week, for the Government to buy an antibody test from a company called Abbott, but financial details of this have not been published.

    That and Roche’s were the first two tests to be evaluated by PHE and a combined 10million were bought almost immediately. Other tests since then have been evaluated and none have performed as well as Abbott’s test but at least one was better than Roche’s.

    Professor Deeks said: ‘The other issue here was PHE raced through the two tests from Roche and Abbott for evaluation – nothing else was completed for any other competitor test for weeks afterwards, and I know others have been waiting for weeks without getting an assessment done.

    ‘The idea that there was a fair assessment to see what tests were going to be the best before deciding what to buy is not there.

    ‘It appears that Roche and Abbott were somehow pre-selected to have their assessments accelerated ahead of other competitors.

    ‘It does not seem that it was a fair competition or done in a way to make sure we get the best test.’ 

    A Department of Health and Social Care spokesperson said: ‘As is standard practice, contracts were only placed when Public Health England’s evaluation of each test was confirmed, and to suggest anything otherwise would be completely incorrect.’

    The Department said it was working ‘at pace’ to secure antibody tests and that it wanted to avoid delays to getting them into use.

    Government contracts show that PHE has bought other, worse-performing, tests than Roche’s before publishing evaluations of them, costing at least £1.8m.

    But these were not given lavish publicity and hailed as ‘game-changers’ by top politicians, as Roche’s test was. 

    WHAT ANTIBODY TESTS HAS PHE LOOKED AT AND WHICH ONES DID IT BUY?

    Public Health England has published evaluations of seven lab-based Covid-19 antibody tests and these are its results.

    Sensitivity denotes how many positive results the test would correctly identify in a group of people who have had Covid-19. 

    Specificity denotes how many negative results the test would correctly identify in a group of people who have not had Covid-19.   

    Roche Diagnostics 

    • Evaluation published: May 18
    • Did it buy? £13.46million on May 15
    • Sensitivity: 83.9%
    • Specificity: 100%

    Abbott Laboratories

    • Evaluation: May 18
    • Did it buy? Yes. Date/cost unknown
    • Sensitivity: 92.7%
    • Specificity: 100% 

    Ortho Clinical Diagnostics (1)

    • Evaluation: May 29
    • Did it buy? Unknown
    • Sensitivity: 77.4%
    • Specificity: 99.7% 

    EuroImmun

    • Evaluation: June 18
    • Did it buy? £1.5m on May 12
    • Sensitivity: 72%
    • Specificity: 99%

    DiaSorin

    • Evaluation: June 18
    • Did it buy? £300,000 on April 22
    • Sensitivity: 64%
    • Specificity: 97.7% 

    Ortho Clinical Diagnostics (2)

    • Evaluation: June 22
    • Did it buy? Yes. Date/cost unknown
    • Sensitivity: 85%
    • Specificity: 99.5%

    Siemens

    • Evaluation: June 22
    • Did it buy? Yes. Date/cost unknown
    • Sensitivity: 86%
    • Specificity: 100%
    Advertisement

    When Roche received the results from PHE’s evaluation, they were leaked to the press and newspapers published front page stories on May 13 hailing the test’s ‘100 per cent accuracy’.

    And the next day, health minister Edward Argar MP did an appearance on BBC Radio 4 when he said: ‘We are keen to get as many as quickly as we can and get them out, primarily to the front line first, the NHS, social care and then more widely.

    ‘Because this really will be – as the Prime Minister said – this has the potential to be a game-changer.’

    But when PHE published its evaluation of Roche’s test later that week, it emerged that it only achieved 100 per cent accuracy on one measure.

    It was 100 per cent specific, meaning it did not react to other viruses and cause false positive results. 

    But PHE found it was only 84 per cent sensitive, meaning it would miss 16 out of every 100 positive results.   

    Roche insists that its own evaluations found the test to be 100 per cent sensitive.

    A spokesperson for Roche Diagnostics UK and Ireland said: ‘From the early stages of the pandemic, we have supported the collective response to Covid-19 and are one of a number of companies working with the NHS to help increase testing capacity.

    ‘Our tests are highly accurate and reliable, and have undergone rigorous review. The diagnostics industry is heavily regulated and all commercial contracts are subject to EU guidelines and procurement law. In line with these requirements, and alongside a number of other companies, we submitted our antibody test to PHE for independent evaluation after it received its CE mark.’

    Other tests evaluated later proved to be more accurate than Roche’s. 

    One made by Abbott Laboratories, which was bought in the same week, was 93 per cent sensitive and 100 per cent specific – by far the best one evaluated so far. It is not clear how much PHE has spent on these tests.

    A test made by Siemens turned out in June to be 86 per cent sensitive and 100 per cent specific – better than Roche’s. 

    The Department of Health confirmed this was being used but the quantity and cost of the deal is unknown. 

    A Siemens Healthineers spokesperson said: ‘The SARS-CoV-2 total antibody test from Siemens Healthineers has been appraised by Public Health England and is available in the UK. 

    ‘The test is in use in UK laboratories and we actively encourage NHS pathology testing facilities to further consider it due to its timely availability, quality, scalability and accessibility.’

    And a test manufactured by the company Ortho Clinical Diagnostics was found to be 85 per cent sensitive (higher than Roche) and 99.5 per cent specific (lower than Roche). These were also bought in undisclosed deals.

    Roche may have got a fast deal with PHE because labs around the country already have its machines and use them for other tests, one scientist said.

    The tests that have to be purchased are disposable cassettes containing chemicals to mix with blood samples, and their results are read with ELISA lab machines that are already widely used.

    Dr Al Edwards, a pharmacy researcher and medical test developer at the University of Reading, said this was an unavoidable fact of business.

    He told MailOnline: ‘There’s a pure infrastructure argument. It may simply be that we have all the Roche machines lying around. You can’t run a Siemens test on a Roche machine. 

    ‘There are three, four or five multinational companies running systems in hospitals and you can’t just buy new machines.

    ‘If you have Roche, Abbott and one other company offering tests but hospitals have only got Roche and Abbott machines, the other company will never get in.

    ‘If you’ve already got Apple and Windows you’re not going to get a Linux computer.’ 

    Professor Jon Deeks said ‘Lucky Roche’ in a tweet in which he accused the government of ‘panic buying not following the science’

    The British Government’s attempts to get antibody tests for Covid-19 have been plagued by wasted money and setbacks.

    A ‘buy first, test later’ approach had already stung officials out of £20million by May.

    The Department of Health confirmed that it had cancelled orders for £70million worth of tests after striking deals for them, because they turned out to be bad.

    That figure was out of a total £90million, suggesting the remaining £20million could not be recouped and the tests must now be used for non-diagnostic purposes or scrapped.

    WHAT IS AN ANTIBODY TEST AND WHAT IS IT USED FOR? 

    Antibody tests are ones which look for signs of past infection in someone’s blood. 

    Antibodies are substances produced by the immune system which store memories of how to fight off a specific virus. They can only be created if the body is exposed to the virus by getting infected for real, or through a vaccine or other type of specialist immune therapy.

    Generally speaking, antibodies produce immunity to a virus because they are redeployed if it enters the body for a second time, defeating the bug faster than it can take hold and cause an illness. 

    An antibody test, which involves analysis of someone’s blood sample, has two purposes: to reveal whether an individual has been infected in the past and may therefore be protected against the virus, and to count those people.

    Knowing you are immune to a virus – although whether people actually develop immunity to Covid-19 is still unknown – can affect how you act in the future. Someone may need to protect themselves less if they know they have been infected, for example, or medical staff may be able to return to work in the knowledge they are not at risk.

    Counting the numbers of people who have antibodies is the most accurate way of calculating how many people in a population have had the virus already.

    This can be done on a small sample of the population and the figures scaled up to give a picture of the country as a whole.

    In turn, this can inform scientists and politicians how devastating a second outbreak might be, and how close the country is to herd immunity – a situation in which so many people have had the virus already that it would not be able to spread quickly a second time.

    Experts believe that around 60 per cent exposure would be required for herd immunity from Covid-19, but the UK does not appear to be anywhere close to that.

    Early estimates suggest 17 per cent of Londoners have had the virus, along with five per cent of the rest of the country – about 4.83million people.

    This means the virus might spread slightly slower in future but the risk of second outbreak and hundreds or thousands more deaths remains very real. 

    The Department said some of the tests are being used for research.

    And it emerged in May that Public Health England is using a test which one study found was just 67 per cent sensitive, meaning it missed a third of positive cases.

    Government contracts data shows PHE paid £1.5million for this test, named the EuroImmun IGg ELISA test, in March and a further £2.5m in May.

    study of the test’s accuracy, by the Statens Serum Institut in Copenhagen, found that it was 67 per cent sensitive and also that it cross-reacted – gave a false positive result – when exposed to a different type of coronavirus and also two adenoviruses, which cause coughs, colds and sore throats. 

    ‘That’s not accurate,’ said Dr Simon Clarke, a cellular microbiology expert at the University of Reading.

    ‘The problem is it will underestimate the positives and they [PHE] won’t appreciate how quickly or how extensively it [Covid-19] has spread through the population.

    ‘If you’re underestimating it by up to a third – it’s important to say up to – then what’s the point? There are more accurate tests on the way.

    ‘Throughout this whole saga there has been a lot of doing things to create the impression of activity. While it’s important to be active, it’s also important to be accurate and if that means waiting then that’s what should be done.’

    Scientists are no longer even confident that antibody tests should be used at all for anything other than surveillance – working out how many people have had Covid-19.

    In general medical terms the presence of antibodies in the blood suggests that someone is immune to a disease.

    For this reason, people receiving a positive antibody test may think that they are protected from the disease and not abide as strictly by lockdown rules.

    But scientists still don’t know if people can catch Covid-19 more than once, or whether they build up any kind of immunity to it after a first infection. 

    Some people who are known to have had Covid-19 are producing test results which don’t show any antibodies at all, raising questions about the immune response it triggers.  

    This is the reason the Government has held off offering the tests to the public after originally promising them in March.

    Reading University’s Dr Edwards explained: ‘The tests are still useful for things like the Office for National Statistics surveillance but if we’re rolling out tests indiscriminately there will be a problem.

    ‘People want to know [if they’ve had Covid-19] for lots of reasons but what they perhaps don’t realise is that they’ll suddenly be faced with not really knowing what the test means.

    ‘The tests are incredibly important for lots of different research reasons that feed into public health powerfully, but they don’t help anybody on an individual level.’

    HOME ANTIBODY TESTS MISS A THIRD OF POSITIVE RESULTS, STUDY WARNS 

    Coronavirus antibody tests that can be done at home would get the results wrong a third of the time, a damning study has found.

    A review of research found that rapid ‘have you had it’ coronavirus kits, which screen the blood to look for signs of past infection, have major flaws. 

    They correctly identify someone who has had the disease only 66 per cent of the time, on average – and this could drop as low as 49 per cent in some cases.

    Officials in the UK have refused to offer antibody tests to the public because they fear people will stop following social distancing rules if they think they’re immune to Covid-19. In reality, there is no proof that people cannot get the illness twice.

    The study in the British Medical Journal found that lab-based tests were more accurate but still not perfect, correctly identifying positive results between 84 and 97.8 per cent of the time.   

    The findings, based on 40 studies from around the world – most of them in China – suggest the tests are not ready for mass use.  

    A review of research found that rapid ‘have you had it’ coronavirus kits, which give a result on the spot, correctly identify someone has had the disease just 66 per cent of the time. This compares with laboratory-read antibody tests –  which can correctly identify someone who has had Covid-19 at least 84 per cent of the time 

    The post UK Government ‘panic bought’ £13.4million worth of Roche’s coronavirus antibody tests appeared first on Sound Health and Lasting Wealth.

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  • Stephen Hahn refuses to comment on Trump’s claim 99% of coronavirus cases are ‘totally harmless’
    05 July 2020

    Stephen Hahn wouldn’t comment Sunday morning on President Doanld Trump’s claim that the vast majority of coronavirus cases are ‘totally harmless.’

    ‘So, I’m not going to get into who’s right and who’s wrong,’ the Food and Drug Administration commissioner told CNN when asked if there was any evidence to back up the president’s claim.

    During a White House speech Saturday to commemorate Independence Day celebrations, Trump reasserted that the U.S. has more confirmed cases than any other country due to bolstered levels of testing.

    ‘Now we have tested almost 40 million people,’ the president said during his address. ‘By so doing, we show cases 99 per cent of which are totally harmless.’

    When Hahn was pushed on if he would say if Trump’s statement were ‘true or false,’ Hahn again dodged the question.

    ‘What I’ll say is that we have data in the White House Task Force, those data show us that this is a serious problem. People need to take it seriously,’ he said.

    FDA Commissioner and member of the White House Coronavirus Task Force Stephen Hahn refused to comment Sunday morning on if there is any validity to Donald Trump’s claim that 99 per cent of coronavirus cases are ‘totally harmless’

    ‘So, I’m not going to get into who’s right and who’s wrong,’ Hahn told CNN as the number of infections continue to skyrocket over the last two weeks

    During Independence Day remarks at the White House, Trump said: ‘Now we have tested almost 40 million people. By so doing, we show cases, 99 per cent of which are totally harmless’

    Instead of commenting on Trump’s claims, Hahn, who is a member of the White House Coronavirus Task Force, said he would reiterate that COVID-19 is a ‘serious problem’ in the U.S.

    ‘We’ve seen a surge in cases, we must do something to stem the tide – and we have this in our power to do it by following the guidance of the White House Task Force and the CDC,’ Hahn told fill-in State of the Union host Dana Bash.

    Conversely, Trump asserted during his address Saturday night, ‘We’ve learned how to put out the flame’ of coronavirus – even though the U.S. has recorded daily record-highs in cases.

    As states ended their lockdown orders, began reopening and massive protests ensued across the country over the death of George Floyd, coronavirus cases, which were on the steady decline, began to surge.

    Some states, like Florida, experienced their highest number of new daily cases in the past two weeks.

    Trump also continued, during his remarks, to put the onus for the coronavirus pandemic’s scale on China, claiming they engaged in a ‘cover-up.’

    ‘China’s secrecy, deceptions and cover-up allowed it to spread all over the world [in] 189 countries and China must be held fully accountable,’ the president asserted.

    Trump also insisted that the U.S. would develop a vaccine or some other therapeutic solution to treat the virus ‘long before’ the end of 2020.

    The president traveled to the Mount Rushmore Memorial in South Dakota on Friday, July 3 for the Independence Day celebration there.

    The post Stephen Hahn refuses to comment on Trump’s claim 99% of coronavirus cases are ‘totally harmless’ appeared first on Sound Health and Lasting Wealth.

  • Firefighters rush to save animals as huge blaze breaks out at Scottish zoo
    05 July 2020

    A zoo in Fife says all of its animals and staff are safe after a fire broke out on Sunday afternoon.

    Fire crews were called to Fife Zoo near Ladybank shortly after midday as the roof of a building caught fire.

    Photos on social media showed smoke billowing from the site.

    A zoo in Fife says all of its animals and staff are safe after a fire broke out on Sunday afternoon. Photos on social media showed smoke billowing from the site

    The Scottish Fire and Rescue Service said one person was treated for smoke inhalation, though the zoo’s owners later posted on Facebook saying everyone was safe.

    They said: ‘Some of you may have already seen the news, but sadly we have had a fire at Fife Zoo. We are currently closed and will keep everyone updated as best we can.

    ‘All humans and animals are safe. All emergency teams are on site to contain the fire. Thank you for the concern.’

    The zoo reopened at the end of June following the coronavirus lockdown.

    The Scottish Fire and Rescue Service said one person was treated for smoke inhalation

    Lemurs and zebras are among its animals.

    A spokeswoman for the fire service said: ‘We were alerted at 12.11pm on Sunday July 5 to reports of a fire at Fife Zoo near Collessie in Fife.

    ‘Operations control mobilised four appliances, a height appliance and specialist resources.

    ‘Crews are working to extinguish a fire within the roof space of a building.

    ‘One casualty suffering from smoke inhalation has been handed to the care of the ambulance service. Firefighters remain at the scene.’

    The post Firefighters rush to save animals as huge blaze breaks out at Scottish zoo appeared first on Sound Health and Lasting Wealth.

  • Second Spanish region goes back into lockdown after new Covid outbreak
    05 July 2020

    A second Spanish region made up of 70,000 people is going back into lockdown after a new coronavirus outbreak.

    Entry into and out of La Marina, which lies 90 miles east of La Coruna in Galicia, will be banned from midnight tonight andgatherings of more than ten people will be banned to limit the possibility of contagion.

    Locals will not be stopped from moving within the 14 municipalities that make up the region.

    The use of face masks will also be made mandatory at all times outdoors, including on beaches and swimming pools.

    Bars and restaurants will have to respect new closing times and tighter restrictions on the number of customers.

    The lockdown follows a new Covid-19 outbreak which has seen 106 people test positive for the virus.

    Entry into and out of La Marina, a region which lies north of Lugo in Galicia will be banned from midnight tonight

    A view of La Marina port. The use of face masks will be made mandatory at all times outdoors, including on beaches and swimming pools

    Bars and restaurants will have to respect new closing times and tighter restrictions on the number of customers. Above, La Coruna port in Galicia 

    Local reports say all those who don’t live in La Marina will have to leave the area at midnight tonight or stay for the next five days.

    It comes after Spain’s Catalonia region yesterday locked down a county of more than 400,000 people following a surge in coronavirus cases – just as Brits prepared to go there on holiday.

    The western Catalan city of Lleida and the rest of Segrià county was put under lockdown from midday on Saturday. 

    ‘We have decided to confine the del Segria zone following data confirming a sharp rise in COVID-19 infections,’ Catalonia’s regional president Quim Torra told reporters, adding that no one would be allowed to enter or leave the area.

    Around 431,183 people live in Lleida, according to 2019 figures, which is 173.9km inland from Barcelona.

    It comes after the UK Government lifted restrictions to let people living in England travel to the country on ‘air bridges’ – meaning holidaymakers won’t have to go into quarantine as long as they return to England on or after July 10.

    ‘We are taking a step back to protect ourselves and control the outbreak,’ said Torra, who described the measure as a ‘difficult decision.’ 

    There have been 62,057 confirmed cases in Catalonia since the outbreak began, with 5,673 related deaths. 

    On Twitter the president added: ‘The people of #Segrià should remain calm. You can count on our support. We need to take every measure possible to protect you and prevent an even larger rise in the number of new cases.’ 

    The western Catalan city of Lleida and the rest of Segrià county was put under lockdown from midday today. Pictured, police officers check the documents of people travelling on vehicles at the entrance of Lleida

    The situation became so serious in recent weeks the health emergencies service had to preemptively build a field hospital (pictured) outside Arnau de Vilanova hospital to treat up to 105 patients if needed

    Passengers arrive on EasyJet and Ryanair flights to Palma Majorca today from London Stansted and Luton in the UK as Brits make the most of ‘air bridges’ 

    Miquel Buch, the Catalan interior minister, said anyone in Segrià county who wanted to leave needed to do so before the strict lockdown was imposed at 12pm. 

    He asked anyone in the county not to travel between towns, visit retirement homes or meet in groups of more than ten. 

    Segrià county, an agricultural hotspot with a number of slaughterhouses, has faced a sudden jump in cases compared to the rest of the region. 

    Lleida’s main hospital had six Covid-19 patients in regular rooms and four in the ICU, health minister Alba Vergés said on June 22.

    On Friday the figure jumped to 21 Covid-19 patients in regular rooms and six in the ICU, but the department of health denied they were going to lockdown parts of Lleida. In a dramatic U-turn the ministry announced a lockdown of the entire county this morning.

    The situation became so serious in recent weeks the health emergencies service had to preemptively build a field hospital outside Arnau de Vilanova hospital to treat up to 105 patients if needed. 

    The Catalonian government shared an image of ministers at Palau del Parlament de Catalunya in Barcelona as they made the decision to lock down the 1,396 km-wide area 

    A member of the Catalan regional police force Mossos d’Esquadra controls a checkpoint on the Corbins highway near Lleida

    Cars were stopped by regional police at a checkpoint on the Corbins highway near Lleida after the border into the region was closed amid a coronavirus lockdown

    The number of cases is not currently a concern, health officials said, but they want to curb the community spread before the virus becomes out of control. 

    On Friday, the ministry of health announced 276 newly confirmed Covid-19 cases in the previous 24 hours, 60 of which came from Lleida. Some 4,030 cases of COVID-19 were confirmed in the province of Lleida.

    Many of those infected are believed to be seasonal fruit pickers, with the outbreak also hitting an apartment building, a nursing home, and a shelter for homeless people, according to Anadolu Agency.

    ‘The virus is being transmitted, we really want to flatten the curve in Lleida,’ Ms Vergés said during a press conference on Friday.

    The county borders the Spanish region of Aragon, which was the first Spanish region to declare local lockdowns when the country’s state of emergency came to an end on June 21. 

    Catalonia’s regional president Quim Torra (pictured) told reporters his government had decided to ‘confine the del Segria zone’ after a rise in cases, adding that no one would be allowed to enter or leave the area

    A passenger wearing a face mask arrived to board Ryanair flight FR2190 to Malaga at London Southend Airport in Essex on Wednesday

    Holidaymakers returned to Portals Nous in Mallorca yesterday as Spain’s tourism industry opened amid coronavirus

    It comes after a Covid-19 outbreak last month in Lleida’s Castrillón care home. Tests found five workers and 13 elderly persons tested positive. Four people had to be hospitalised. 

    Spain’s mortality rate had recently returned to normal compared with the same period over the previous five years, with no excess deaths since 18 May.

    Some 174 infections have been diagnosed in the country in the last 24 hours, an increase compared to yesterday when 134 were registered. In total 250,545 have been infected in Spain.

    After almost 100 days of confinement, Spain had reached the so-called new normal. Restrictions were lifted and borders with the EU and 15 non-Schengen area countries were opened.  

    Arrivals from the UK don’t have to self-isolate on arrival but will have to wear face masks on public transport and public spaces where it is not possible to maintain a five-foot distance.  

    Travellers from England can now visit 73 destinations with no mandatory quarantine upon their return from July 10 – including France, Italy, Spain, Germany, New Zealand, Malta and Barbados. 

    A spokesman for Spain’s Ministry of Health, Consumption and Social Welfare told MailOnline: ‘[Coronavirus chief] Fernando Simón has always maintained that the virus has not disappeared, that it is still there, so the fact that cases are diagnosed means that the detection systems are working.

    ‘The key in this phase is early detection and case tracking. 60 per cent of the cases that are now detected are asymptomatic, that is, with less impact on the individual.

    ‘Outbreaks are and will remain as long as there is no vaccine, the most important thing is to detect them quickly and trace contacts to keep it under control.’ 

    In Catalonia, the government had given individuals the responsibility to avoid contagion. The restrictions on capacity in bars and restaurants no longer applied but venues did have to ensure a distance of five feet between people.  

    The post Second Spanish region goes back into lockdown after new Covid outbreak appeared first on Sound Health and Lasting Wealth.

  • Man snapped fleeing collapsing World Trade Center on 9/11 in famous photo dies from COVID-19
    05 July 2020

    A man who was photographed in a famous photo of terrified New Yorkers fleeing the smoke and debris of the falling World Trade Center as it tumbled to the ground on September 11, 2001, has died of coronavirus, his family said.

    Stephen Cooper, an electrical engineer from New York, who lived part-time in the Delray Beach area of Florida, died on March 28 at the age of 78.

    He died at the Delray Medical Center after catching the disease and was among the 138 people who died in Palm Beach County in the first month of the pandemic.

    The photo snapped by an Associated Press photographer was published in newspapers and magazines around the world and is featured in the 9/11 Memorial Museum in New York.

    He was 60 at the time and photographed running with a manila envelope under his arm alongside several other men as a cloud of smoke from the hit South Tower of the World Trade Center billowed behind.

    Stephen Cooper, who was photographed in a famous photo of terrified New Yorkers fleeing the smoke and debris of the falling World Trade Center as it tumbled to the ground on September 11, 2001, has died of coronavirus, his family said. Cooper pictured left with a manila envelope in hand

    ‘He didn’t even know the photograph was taken,’ Janet Rashes, Cooper’s partner for 33 years said.

    ‘All of a sudden, he’s looking in Time magazine one day and he sees himself and says, “Oh my God. That’s me.” He was amazed. Couldn’t believe it,’ she added.

    Rashes said Cooper was delivering documents near the World Trade Center the morning of 9/11, clueless to the terror unfolding, when he heard a police officer yell at him, “You have to run.”

    ‘Every year on 9/11, he would go looking for the magazine and say, “Look, it’s here again,’ Jessica Rashes, Cooper’s 27-year-old daughter said. In 1993, Cooper and Rashes adopted Jessica from Guatemala. 

    ‘He would bring it to family barbecues, parties, anywhere he could show it off.’

    Coopers longtime friend Susan Gould said he was proud of the photo and purchased multiple copies of Time to hand them out ‘like a calling card’.

    She said Cooper shrank a copy of the photo, laminated it, and kept it in his wallet.

    ‘Stephen was a character,’ Gould said.

    He was an electrical engineer from New York who worked for the NY Transit Authority for many years. Pictured right in October 2019

    ‘Every year on 9/11, he would go looking for the magazine and say, “Look, it’s here again,’ Jessica Rashes, Cooper’s 27-year-old daughter said. In 1993, Cooper and Rashes adopted Jessica from Guatemala. Rashes and Cooper pictured with young Jessica in a photo she shared on social media

    The iconic photograph was taken by Suzanne Plunkett, who revealed she’s been in touch with two of the people in the photo but she could never reach Cooper.

    ‘It is a shame I was never aware of the identity of Mr Cooper,’ Plunkett said to the Palm Beach Post.

    Cooper, who was born in the Brox and served stateside with the Army in the Vietnam War, worked for many years for the New York City Transit Authority.

    Cooper was a beloved figure in his neighbourhood of Edgemere, New York in Queens, where he owned a home for much of his life.

    Cooper was a beloved figure in his neighbourhood of Edgemere, New York in Queens, where he owned a home for much of his life and was actively involved in local politics to protect the neighborhood

    It’s there he flung himself into local politics and participated in protests to keep the area from being ‘dumped on’ with unwanted projects like landfills. He served as president of the Frank Avenue Civic Association, a community group.

    ‘He didn’t get too far very often. Sort of a Don Quixote. But the people really liked him because he was there to speak for them,’ Rashes said. 

    Cooper had been suffering with health issues before he contracted COVID-19. In October he had brain surgery and spent more than two months hospitalized or in a rehabilitation center after surgery.

    In March his health declined again after he returned home to Rashes at their apartment in Delray Beach.

    ‘At that point, the coronavirus was being spoken of but the people at the hospital weren’t wearing masks,’ Rashes said.

    He was initially diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    ‘(Paramedics) picked him up on March 23. That’s the last time I saw him,’ Rashes said.

    He died five days later.   

    The post Man snapped fleeing collapsing World Trade Center on 9/11 in famous photo dies from COVID-19 appeared first on Sound Health and Lasting Wealth.

  • Summer Monteys-Fullam teases a glimpse of her taut midriff in crop-top
    05 July 2020

    She’s been keeping busy looking after her horses amid the UK’scoronavirus lockdown. 

    And Summer Monteys-Fullam looked incredible as she shared a candid snap of herself on a sunkissed stroll on Sunday.

    The ex girlfriend of GBBO star Paul Hollywood, 25, teased a glimpse of her washboard abs in a tiny white crop-top, which also displayed her cleavage.

    Work it: Summer Monteys-Fullam looked incredible as she shared a candid snap of herself on a sunkissed stroll on Sunday

    She paired this with white and black flared trousers, which cinched in at her slender waist.

    The beauty wore her auburn tresses in soft waves with her trademark blunt fringe.

    Her pretty features were enhanced with a radiant palette of make-up.

    She captioned the snap: ‘Only look back to see how far you’ve come.’  

    Last month Summer switched things up as she posed for a radiant photoshoot shared to Instagram.

    The social media influencer caught the eye in a strapless green dress in ruched material, which accentuated her sensational frame.

    Working it: Last month Summer switched things up as she posed for a radiant photoshoot shared to Instagram

    The ex-girlfriend of chef Paul Hollywood added even more glamour to her appearance as she teamed her stunning ensemble with perspex heels.

    Matte foundation complemented her tanned complexion, while her curly fringed tresses framed her heart-shaped face. 

    Alongside the stunning photo, the model shared a message about positivity as she encouraged her fans: ‘What ever is good for your soul, do it.’ (sic)

    ‘Whatever is good for your soul, do it’: Alongside the stunning photo, the social media influencer, 25, shared a message about positivity

    Incredible: The ex-girlfriend of Paul Hollywood is no stranger to sharing striking photos on her platform

    Maintaining her figure: Later into the day, the auburn-haired beauty displayed her toned abs in orange gymwear following a workout

    Summer has been staying at her family home ever since moving back in following her break-up with Paul last year. 

    During lockdown, the redhead focused on caring for her horses, which helped cure her heartache after her bitter split with Paul, 54. 

    Last month, Summer welcomed two foals; Rainbow and Storm, with the delighted star littering her Instagram with updates on her latest additions to the family. 

    Friends of Paul’s revealed his new girlfriend – pub landlady Melissa Spalding, 36 – is self-isolating with him in his £1 million farmhouse, just eight months after splitting from Summer.  

    Friends say she immediately accepted his invitation to relocate from the nearby Chequers pub in the village of Smarden where she lived, amid the COVID-19 lockdown.

    Paul bought the Grade II-listed house last year for him and Summer to live in.    

    A friend told The Mail on Sunday: ‘Paul and Melissa got together soon after his split from Summer and they are really happy together. Actually it’s looking like this one could very well last for Paul.’ 

    Congratulations! Last month, Summer welcomed two foals; Rainbow and Storm, with the delighted star littering her Instagram with updates on her latest additions

    The post Summer Monteys-Fullam teases a glimpse of her taut midriff in crop-top appeared first on Sound Health and Lasting Wealth.

  • Emily Atack lets her hair down with her pals at a beer garden on Super Saturday
    05 July 2020

    She recently said she ‘can’t wait’ to get back in the bar, a setting she describes as her ‘happy place’.

    And Emily Atack appeared over the moon with her pals at a beer garden in London as restaurants, pubs, cafes, and cinemas in England reopened for the first time in three months amid the COVID-19 crisis on Saturday.

    Theactress, 30, couldn’t contain her delight as she caught up with her nearest and dearest over some booze.

    Cheery: Emily Atack was over the moon with her pals at a London beer garden as restaurants, pubs, cafes, and cinemas in England reopened for the first time in three months on Saturday

    The Inbetweeners star put on an animated display as she chatted up a storm with her friends in the outdoor area. 

    Cutting a chic figure, the blonde beauty stunned in a white shirt dress, complete with a cinched waistline to highlight her one-stone weight loss.

    The media personality nailed biker chic in the footwear department as she strutted across the streets of the English capital in black ankle boots.

    Toting her essentials in a crossbody handbag, the thespian rounded things off with a pair of skinny cat-eye shades and a selection of gold jewellery.  

    In good company: The actress, 30, couldn’t contain her delight as she caught up with her nearest and dearest over some booze

    Wow-factor: Cutting a chic figure, the blonde beauty stunned in a white shirt dress, complete with a cinched waistline to highlight her one-stone weight loss

    The Inbetweeners star put on an animated display as she chatted up a storm with her friends in the outdoor area.

    Emily wore her tresses in wavy tresses while her radiant complexion was enhanced with dewy make-up. 

    Her outing came just days after she admitted she’s shed ‘a lot of pounds by accident’ and feels ‘much healthier’ during the closure of the hospitality industry amid the global crisis.

    In April, Emily revealed she lost a stone in three months after a troll warned she would ‘put on weight’ in quarantine.

    Sharing the secrets behind her slimmed-down figure, the TV star told us: ‘I think because I haven’t been able to the pubs I’m healthier. I’ve been working out a lot in my garden, which I’m very lucky to have.’   

    High spirits: The Inbetweeners star put on an animated display as she chatted up a storm with her friends in the outdoor area

    Radiant: Emily wore her tresses in wavy tresses while her clear complexion was enhanced with dewy make-up

    Weight loss: Her outing came just days after she admitted she’s shed ‘a lot of pounds by accident’ during the closure of the hospitality industry amid the global crisis

    All in the details: Toting her essentials in a crossbody handbag, the thespian rounded things off with a pair of skinny cat-eye shades and a selection of gold jewellery

    The I’m A Celebrity 2018 contestant also detailed the positive effects of exercise on her mental health: ‘I’ve lost a lot of weight by accident really.

    ‘It wasn’t my goal to lose weight but I think it’s down to not going to pubs and restaurants. I work out more so for my mental health, the goal is never to lose weight but to remain as happy and healthy as I can be.’   

    The TV presenter confessed she still likes to treat herself to a glass of wine once in a while, stating: ‘I’ve definitely been boozing in lockdown like everyone but I’ve been conscious to not drink too much.’   

    Standing tall: The media personality nailed biker chic in the footwear department as she strutted across the streets of the English capital in black ankle boots

     â€˜I’m working out a lot in my garden’: In April, Emily revealed she lost a stone in three months after a troll warned she would ‘put on weight’ in quarantine

    Explaining the significance of pubs, she declared: ‘I can’t wait to go back to the pub! 

    ‘With that, we all laugh and say, “classic Brits just want to get back to the pub”, but the pub is so much more than a pub. 

    ‘It’s where we share our deepest and darkest secrets and have every type of conversation. It’s our happy place. I shall be doing the Conga when I get back!’ 

    Heading to their next destination: The group stood by the road as they hailed a cab following their drinking session

    In the work department, the host is set to front her own stand-up tour, Emily Atack Has Left The Group, next year. 

    On second guessing herself at times, she detailed in a new interview with You magazine: ‘My dad [musician Keith Atack] said to me the other day, “The genius thing about you is that you lead everybody to think what you’re about to do is going to be a disaster, then you smash it.”’

    ‘I don’t mean to do that. I’m messy and I’m scatty and I have this outer shell of looking like I’m useless at everything but, actually, when I put my mind to things and I have some self-belief, I can do anything.’

    ‘I have some self-belief’: In the work department, the host will front her stand-up tour, Emily Atack Has Left The Group, next year, which she detailed in a new interview with You magazine

    The post Emily Atack lets her hair down with her pals at a beer garden on Super Saturday appeared first on Sound Health and Lasting Wealth.

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