Well-being - Personal Development

Personal Development Blogs

28 September 2021

Personal Development Blogs
  • Stigma and Addiction Recovery
    28 September 2021

    Tragically, overdose deaths skyrocketed by nearly 30% from 2019 to more than 93,000 in 2020 according to CDC data released in July, driven largely by Fentanyl.  The CDC and SAMHSA announced that Federal funding may now be used to purchase Fentanyl testing strips to help curb the dramatic spike in drug overdose deaths.  Even more tragically, many Americans still believe it is a moral weakness exacerbated by the pandemic at the root of these deaths, versus them having what can be a fatal and progressive disease.   

    Epigenetics research shows that a combination of trauma, genetic predisposition and other environmental factors greatly increase the likelihood that a person will develop drug addiction or alcoholism (Substance Use Disorder “SUD” and Alcohol Use Disorder “AUD” are the mental health clinical terms).  This, coupled with a new article this month in the journal Pediatrics shows nearly half of the opioids prescribed to children and young adults under 21 (sometimes in overlapping prescriptions of benzodiazepines which are also addictive) after surgery, dental care or for other conditions have been deemed “high risk”, meaning they exceeded recommended supplies/doses or included a drug combination of drugs not recommended for children.  The western medicine approach of treating primarily the symptom instead of taking the time to also address the root cause is a shortfall that could be helped by integrated pediatric clinical care. If addressed correctly, this could extend to requiring all pediatricians in the U.S. to  use ACE’s screenings for evaluating the child and parent in order to come up with a holistic approach of helping the child versus misdiagnosing them based on not having the full picture of the causes of the presenting medical issue.  In turn, this would help the child and parent get on the path of breaking down intergenerational trauma while also creating a path to healing that would lessen the likelihood and severity of an SUD/AUD developing in adolescence or adulthood.

    This common misunderstanding of SUD/AUD as a “moral weakness” and the resulting stigma is compounded by the idea that therapy, education and medications can always fix the problem.  Last Summer, there was a comprehensive report and summary by the Recovery Research Institute comparing the effectiveness of Alcoholic Anonymous and Twelve-Step Facilitation (a clinical protocol for linking clients to 12-Step programs like AA) to other clinical interventions. The findings showed that AA produces rates of alcohol abstinence and alcohol use comparable to first-line clinical interventions, and outperforms them over follow ups at 3, 6, 12 and 36 months after receiving treatment.  The research team found that AA/12-Step Facilitation was, overall, better than other empirically-supported treatments in facilitating continuous abstinence and remission and was at least as effective as other well-established treatment in reducing intensity of drinking, alcohol-related consequences and severity of alcohol addiction.  AA/12-Step Facilitation also reduced healthcare costs substantially more than other types of treatments.  Another rigorous NIH study referenced a Recovery Research Institute article which found that “AA typically confers benefits by mobilizing multiple therapeutic factors simultaneously—mostly through facilitating adaptive changes in the social networks of participants, but also by boosting members’ recovery coping skills, recovery motivation, abstinence self-efficacy and psychological well-being and by reducing impulsivity and craving. It seems plausible that AA/Twelve-Step Facilitation often outperforms other treatments at much lower cost because it successfully links people to a free, ubiquitous, easily accessible, long-term recovery support option that, in turn, mobilizes other therapeutic mechanisms similar to those mobilized by professional treatment.” This suggests that a holistic approach to a long-term recovery solution that simultaneously integrates the mind, body and spirit, like AA and peer mentoring recovery homes that incorporate a 12-step approach, often motivated in treatment by 12-Step Facilitation is a comprehensive and effective way to treat SUD/AUD.  Conversely, it calls into question the long-term efficacy of approaches to recovery that focus more on short-term interventions that primarily rely on incorporating therapy and medications.

    Another conundrum that creates confusion about SUD/AUD as a disease versus a moral weakness is the prevalence of co-occurring mental health issues with SUD/AUD.  According to the California Health Care Foundation (CHCF) at least 8.9 million American adults – including 500,000 Californians – have both mental illness and SUD.  Katherine Haynes, a senior program officer at the CHCF, wisely states that for many people experiencing challenges of stigma and inadequate coordinated care for their co-occurring mental health, medical and SUD/AUD issues “truly coordinated care – across mental health, substance use and physical health systems – can bring real healing.  In fact, this may be the most successful treatment available: care that actively treats the ‘whole person,’ bringing all health providers together and connecting them to other supports like housing and transitions from residential treatment or incarceration.”

    Taking all of the above into account, especially during National Recovery Month, the idea that drug addiction and alcoholism are moral weaknesses doesn’t bear out. Further, it is clearly a fear-based stigma that only perpetuates further intergenerational trauma, increasing the likelihood you or a loved one will develop an AUD/SUD in this and future generations.  

    Regardless of the path you or your loved one take to find a long-term recovery solution from AUD/SUD, compassion and forgiveness as the watchwords will help all involved find lasting recovery.

  • Michael Dell, Founder of Dell — How to Play Nice But Win (#534)
    28 September 2021
    Illustration via 99designs

    “You learn a lot more from your customers than you do from the competition.”

    — Michael Dell

    Michael Dell (@MichaelDell) is chairman and chief executive officer of Dell Technologies, an innovator and technology leader providing the essential infrastructure for organizations to build their digital future, transform IT, and protect their most important information. He is the author of Play Nice But Win: A CEO’s Journey from Founder to Leader.

    Michael is an honorary member of the Foundation Board of the World Economic Forum and is an executive committee member of the International Business Council. In 1999, he and his wife, Susan Dell, established the Michael & Susan Dell Foundation.

    Please enjoy!

    Listen to the episode on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Overcast, Podcast Addict, Pocket Casts, Stitcher, Castbox, Google Podcasts, Amazon Musicor on your favorite podcast platform. You can also watch the interview on YouTube.

    Brought to you by Wealthfront automated investing, Helix Sleep premium mattresses, and Tonal smart home gym. More on all three below.

    #534: Michael Dell, Founder of Dell — How to Play Nice But Win
    https://rss.art19.com/episodes/f336032e-7386-404a-b5fe-6d748e484384.mp3Download

    This episode is brought to you by WealthfrontWealthfront pioneered the automated investing movement, sometimes referred to as ‘robo-advising,’ and they currently oversee $20 billion of assets for their clients. It takes about three minutes to sign up, and then Wealthfront will build you a globally diversified portfolio of ETFs based on your risk appetite and manage it for you at an incredibly low cost. 

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    What was your favorite quote or lesson from this episode? Please let me know in the comments.

    SCROLL BELOW FOR LINKS AND SHOW NOTES…

    Want to hear another episode with an innovator who understands the value of failure? Listen in on my conversation with Sir James Dyson in which we discuss what it means to think like an engineer, how many tries it took to get a working prototype of his famous Dyson vacuum, the trials and tribulations of funding research and development, why invention is more about persistence than brilliance, experience as baggage that can get in the way, and much more.

    #530: Sir James Dyson — Founder of Dyson and Master Inventor on How to Turn the Mundane into Magic
    https://rss.art19.com/episodes/f42248b4-a289-4893-89a8-a0872c8c17db.mp3Download
    SELECTED LINKS FROM THE EPISODE
    • Connect with Michael Dell:

    Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | LinkedIn

    SHOW NOTES

    Note from the editor: Timestamps will be added shortly.

    • How does meatloaf figure prominently in the story of Michael’s life?
    • Who is Carl Icahn?
    • Where did the title Play Nice But Win originate?
    • Does playing nice make it harder to negotiate or compete against people who don’t live by such a code?
    • How did Michael make $18,000 selling newspaper subscriptions at age 17? What tactics did he employ to gain an edge that wouldn’t normally occur to most 17-year-olds?
    • During this time, were there any entrepreneurial heroes Michael looked up to?
    • Michael wrote his first book, Direct From Dell, in 1998. What does he feel more comfortable discussing now that he may have hesitated to share back then?
    • Memorable mistakes and failures — how Michael felt about them in the moment, and how they drove him to adapt.
    • Is the ability to be more vulnerable something that comes with age?
    • What considerations are especially stressful for a CEO of Michael’s stature when things don’t go according to plan, and what has gotten him through the particularly tough times?
    • As an introvert, how does Michael navigate his high-profile vocation?
    • In retrospect, would Michael have handled his company’s unsustainable early hypergrowth differently?
    • Michael explains what happened when Dell walked back from being publically traded to privately held — and then public once again.
    • What is a tracking stock?
    • What were the risks of going private, and how did Michael think about mitigating them?
    • How was the decision to go public again made?
    • Who was particularly helpful during the take private chapter of this experience?
    • The most worthwhile investments Michael has made.
    • How does Michael think about competition while remaining true to his Play Nice But Win ethos?
    • What are some common mistakes Michael sees when companies engage in a direct-to-consumer business model?
    • As busy as Michael already is, why did he dedicate the time and energy to write Play Nice But Win? What does he hope the reader will take away from it?
    • Parting thoughts.
    MORE MICHAEL DELL QUOTES FROM THE INTERVIEW

    “Failure is a key ingredient in any success.”
    — Michael Dell

    “You learn a lot more from your customers than you do from competition.”
    — Michael Dell

    “I believe fundamentally that organizations like ours and others will be successful if they solve the future problems that customers have. If they don’t, they’ll just go out of business.”
    — Michael Dell

    “I have this belief that a lot of human potential is left unrealized because people are afraid to fail.”
    — Michael Dell

    PEOPLE MENTIONED
  • The Ultimate Guide to Note-Taking: Best Methods and Tips
    28 September 2021

    No matter how you take notes, doing so is critical for understanding, retention, and review. Whether you’re taking lecture notes or jotting down things from a meeting, writing things down makes your life significantly easier.

    Here we’ll discuss type written versus handwritten, seven popular ways of note-taking, and strategies for better note-taking.

    Ready? Let’s dive in.

    Digital Note-Taking vs. Handwritten?

    The age-old debate with note-taking is typed versus handwritten notes. Let’s break down the pros and cons of each method.

    Typed

    Pros:

    • Most of us type much faster, so we can take more information down, which is helpful if you’re recording lecture content
    • Better for organizing notes, flexible formatting, easy to add in spaces for more info
    • Easier to read
    • Easy to add, change, or delete information
    • Typing isn’t that tiring, so you can keep up with longer meetings

    Cons:

    • Since you can type more, you won’t be forced to summarize or draw your own conclusions for the sake of clarity. Summarizing promotes retention and maximum learning.
    • More inclined to type verbatim, even recording useless words
    • Computers are incredibly distracting, with notifications and internet access
    Handwritten

    Pros:

    • Handwritten notes increase short-term and long-term retention
    • Forces active listening, which promotes better understanding
    • Easier time applying material
    • Writing forces you to synthesize, which promotes in-depth knowledge
    • Less distracting
    • Customization with drawings and sketches
    • Forces you to focus on only relevant content

    Cons:

    • Much slower, so it may not be as suited for longer or denser meetings
    • Hard to amend or reformat written notes
    • Possibly illegible
    Which is better for taking effective notes?

    Ultimately, whether handwritten notes or typed notes are better depends on personal preference. If you’re in a meeting where getting all the information is more critical than retention, type notes. If your situation is less dense, but you want to recall details better and apply knowledge, write by hand.

    You can also write notes and type them later, allowing your brain to go back over the material and transform them into a legible, organized form.

    Popular Note-Taking Methods The Outline Note-Taking Method

    The outline format is one of the oldest and most popular note-taking formats out there. While it’s nothing particularly fancy, it’s more efficient and logical.

    Here’s how this method works:

    • Main topics on the left
      • Supporting information is added with another indent
        • Further details are noted with one more indentation
      • Subtopics are added below main topics with an indent

    This logical structure clarifies how the information relates to itself; the indentation indicates the importance and level of information. Indents are made using bullets, numbers, dashes, or other symbols to help break the content down into essential points.

    According to Kenneth A. Kiewera, who published over 20 research papers on this note-taking method between 1984 – 1995, the outline method bears two benefits:

    1. It makes superordinate and subordinate relations obvious, making topics easier to understand
    2. Outline organization of topics and subtopics helps with knowledge retention and makes retrieving information easier

    To properly use this strategy, you’ll want to do the following:

    • Gather note-taking materials. This can include a notebook, writing utensil, and work area.
    • Outline the main topics. There shouldn’t be many main topics; even one is sufficient. This is how you’ll organize the entire set of notes, and you’ll want to keep it succinct. Main topics should be broad enough to add subtopics and further information but specific enough that you aren’t spread too thin and adding tons of them.
    • Outline subtopics. Remember, these are added with one indentation under the main topics. You’re likely to end up with a lot of these.
    • Supporting information. Now it’s time to get specific. Main and subtopics are just that: topics. You’ll need to add in any relevant information, from facts to features to dates, or even your own thoughts.
    • Further details. Lastly, insert any unmentioned information that you feel is relevant. You can write short sentences, key concepts, or draw diagrams.
    The Sentence Method

    The idea behind this note-taking practice is to separate new thoughts by new lines and sentences. Whenever a new concept is introduced, you write it on another line.

    This is a minimal approach and is often used for casual note-taking such as jotting things down from a phone call.

    Some pros of this method include:

    • Easy to use during fast-paced meetings or lecture situations
    • Easy to apply to any context

    Some cons include:

    • Poor organization
    • Lack of clear spatial relationships between points
    • Reviewing notes is time-consuming
    • Shows no connections between thoughts
    • No distinction between main and subtopics

    There are some positives, but there are primarily drawbacks to this method. It should be readily avoided unless you have no other choice.

    Here’s exactly how you would apply the sentence method:

    • Write each sentence on its own line. You’ll have to think quickly in order to record each new concept or idea onto its own line. You’ll want to write in shorthand to decrease the amount of information you have to take down.
    • Number each line so you can better review the info later.
    • Review what you wrote. Since notes are written relatively haphazardly, it’s challenging to properly review them and synthesize information after the meeting. For this reason, we recommend avoiding this method unless you have no other choice and choosing a more well-organized system.
    The Cornell Method

    Perhaps one of the most touted methods, Cornell notes, help foster the natural learning cycle by forcing active engagement and active participation. Developed by Walter Pauk, director of Cornell University’s Reading and Study Skills Center, this note-taking system took off since its inception in 1962.

    Cornell notes involve dividing a paper into three sections: questions in the left-hand column, notes in the right-hand column, and summary area. This forces you to understand information better and is used for all sorts of note-taking.

    What your sheet should look like for Cornell notes

    Surprisingly, Cornell itself uncovered through its free Note-Taking Strategies module that most students want to use their notes to study, but most never actually use them. By implementing the Cornell method, your notes will be in strong enough shape to study effectively.

    You can purchase pre-designed Cornell pads, or you can divide up a piece of paper into the Cornell format on your own. The pads may save time and look neater, but the cost adds up; however, it’s your choice.

    Here’s how to properly use the Cornell method:

    1. Referencing the image above, you’ll want to record your primary notes in the large main column. This is where you take down the essential points and key concepts. Use short sentences and shorthand to ensure you’re getting down all relevant information. You could also add drawings, concept maps, or graphics to your notes column. To help with studying later, you can add bulleted or numbered lists to this column for skimmability.
    2. Retroactively, fill your question/cue column on the left side. This is done after the primary note-taking because it forces you to synthesize and ask questions about all the info you took down. You can also fill this in as you go along but make additions later.
    3. Make summaries in the bottom section to mention all important points discussed on the page. This should be a few sentences in length.
    4. When studying, cover the notes column and use the questions or cues from the left-hand column to quiz yourself. Look back at the notes column – did you get it right?
    The Mapping Method

    The mapping method is challenging, but when done correctly, it pays off. It originates from Tony Buzan, an English author, and consultant. In his book “The Mind Map Book,” he drew attention to this technique, and when the book took off, the mapping method was popularized.

    It’s worth noting that based on modern research, some of the theory behind Buzan’s book is incorrect. He believed that the human brain is divided into the left and right sides and that the two don’t communicate; in 2013, a two-year study concluded that our hemispheres do talk to each other, and we constantly receive input from both.

    Nonetheless, the mapping method remains impactful. It’s best suited for material that’s detailed and targeted. When all categories or subcategories are linked to the main topic, whether directly or indirectly, the mapping method shines, and it gives you a graphic representation of all the information.

    That said, the efficacy of this method is up for debate according to the literature, but that doesn’t render it useless.

    Pros of the mapping method:

    • Easy to edit with additional information
    • Relationships between concepts are easy to see
    • Pictures and graphics help visual learners
    • Efficient to review notes from lectures

    Cons of the mapping method:

    • Often used alongside other methods
    • Strong concentration necessary
    • It can quickly become overwhelming for some subjects
    • Hard to distinguish thoughts and facts
    • It doesn’t always work well, depending on the lecture format

    Here’s how to properly take mapping notes:

    • Write down your main topic. This needs to be the central focus point of the entire map, so select it carefully. If you don’t get it right, you’ll need to remap your notes; that’s incredibly time-consuming and frustrating! Go for something broad enough that you can map onto it but not so broad that it encompasses too much.
    • Add and connect subtopics. If you’re talking about car features, subtopics might be fuel efficiency, horsepower, towing capacity, seating capacity, and so on. Jot these down below and around the main topics, draw circles around them, and connect them to the appropriate main topic.
    • Add supporting ideas. Repeat the above step for supporting information. Some concepts don’t require the addition of supporting ideas, so skip to the next step.
    • Include further information. You don’t need to circle each idea anymore, as this is the final mapping step. Supporting ideas clearly branch out into this additional information, making it clear to understand. You can also start color-coding main ideas, subtopics, supporting ideas, and further details, so they’re easier to distinguish.
    • Review the map. Begin covering lines from different circles and testing if you can recall them. You may also want to review source material during this process, as mapped notes are relatively barren.
    The Boxing Method

    The boxing method is a relatively new style of note-taking developed for digital tools. It takes advantage of digital offerings such as shape, lasso, or drawing tools. This method uses boxes to visually separate topics, and thoughts or ideas are written vertically to form clusters of related information.

    The boxing method is best suited for subjects with fewer subcategories and smaller clusters of information. Although this was originally designed for digital note-takers, it works well for handwritten notes, too. The only difference is that you can’t shift information around on paper with a lasso tool as you can digitally, so pay special attention to positioning.

    Pros of the boxing method:

    • Easy to review and revise
    • Perfect for digital note-takers
    • Aids with visual learning
    • Reduce information without rewriting

    Cons of the boxing method:

    • Time-intensive, so it won’t work for fast-paced classes or meetings
    • Easily distracted by making the aesthetics perfect
    • Requires intense focus

    Here’s how to properly apply the boxing method:

    • Create columns and headings. Split your piece of paper into columns to represent topics. Add headings atop the columns. Horizontal pages are suited to two columns, where vertical pages can accommodate three or four.
    • Add notes to columns. Summarize new pieces of information and add them to the appropriate columns. Place information carefully, as that’s how the boxing method works. Use abbreviations and shorthand wherever you can to take more notes.
    • Move, edit, and resize. This only applies to digital devices, but it can help you reorganize your notes. When reviewing, you may notice that some notes need to be split up or rearranged, and digital tech allows you to do that.
    • Draw boxes. This is where the boxing method gets its name. Since you’ve separated information by topic previously, you’ll need to add boxes around them. You can separate large boxes with lots of information into smaller ones.
    • Review. Cover information by topic and review the notes within 24 hours for maximum retention.
    The Charting Method

    As the name suggests, the charting method uses charts to organize and condense notes. You split your document into rows and columns and add in summaries of information. Each column has its own category, and each row has its own topic.

    Since this method uses charts, you can take notes directly in Excel or Sheets; however, other software like Word or Docs allows for the insertion of charts.

    The charting method is best suited for topics with large quantities of facts or statistics. It’s also appropriate for subtopics that are comparable and information that can be compartmentalized. It won’t be suited for taking notes live, topics with vast detail, or noting spatial relationships.

    To properly take notes with the charting method, follow these steps:

    • Categories and topics. You need to analyze materials before taking notes, so you’ll need to establish topics and categories in your prep. Ascertain the main topic, subtopics, and categories of information. If you’re struggling to find categories, then the charting method likely isn’t the right one for that material.
    • Make a new chart. Whether you use Excel or Sheets or instead insert tables into other documents, create your chart and add an extra notes column to it. You can also add background colors to different columns to help distinguish information.
    • Add categories, topics, and subtopics. Combine steps one and two, and prepare your chart for note-taking.
    • Take notes. Within the appropriate topics, categories, and subtopics, begin inserting your notes. Since your chart was previously prepared, you can focus on writing and retaining relevant material.
    • Review. Given the layout of your charts, you can memorize material by topic or category.
    SQ3R

    This note-taking method is a complicated one, so much so that the founder of Cornell notes, Walter Pauk called it too complex for students.

    SQ3R stands for survey, question, read, recite, review, or the exact process of using these notes. It was originally developed by Francis P. Robinson in 1941.

    Although the jury’s still out on the conclusion of this method’s effectiveness, various studies found benefits of note-taking with this method:

    • SQ3R requires you to use processing systems more effectively
    • Develops better critical thinking, organizational, and association skills
    • It helps you retain more information.

    Some disadvantages include:

    • Steep learning curve
    • Time-intensive
    • Difficult to learn and apply
    • It doesn’t help with organization or integration
    • Only suited to written material

    Here are the steps to the SQ3R method:

    • Survey. Preparing your brain for what’s to come helps it store information more efficiently, as it knows what to expect. First, review your material and skim headings and subheadings. Review other details such as images, tables, or diagrams. Skim the first sentence of each paragraph and review summaries. Keep this quick, under 3-5 minutes.
    • Question. Once you’ve reviewed the material, formulate questions around if so, you know what information to pay attention to. Although generating questions is more complicated, it can pay off.
    • Read. Start reading the information and answer self-generated and provided questions. This method is now forcing you to read actively; this takes far more cognitive effort.
    • Recite. This step is very time-consuming. Put all your transcribed notes into your own words and cover major points. This helps bring information from short-term into long-term storage.
    • Review. Check all headings identified in step one and summarize information into your own words. This immediate review of notes after class or a meeting helps prevent you from quickly forgetting the material.
    Strategies For Better Note Taking

    Be actively engaged

    Although it’s tempting to be distracted, being engaged and asking questions helps you take more robust notes.

    Review before classes or meetings

    Before lectures or meetings, review agendas, textbook chapters, or any other material, this gives you an idea of what you’re learning and prepares your brain.

    Review notes after class or a meeting

    Humans tend to forget information that isn’t thought about immediately. To encode information from short-term into long-term memory, review everything thoroughly after the event.

    Use shortcode

    To help you jot more information down, use abbreviations, bulleted lists, symbols, and drawings to speed up the process.

    Be legible

    If you aren’t typing, focus on writing clearly. Notes are useless if you can’t read them afterward.

    Be organized

    Use one of the note-taking methods above and keep everything organized. This ensures you can quickly review the notes and understand the material.

    Conclusion

    There are various methods of note-taking you can use, and which one you choose depends on personal preference and the material. Whether you prefer physical methods or digital, writing things down will greatly help with retention and review.

    Which will you try first?

  • This Defense Mechanism Comes Up In Arguments A Lot—And It's Pretty Toxic
    28 September 2021
    "You're being dramatic."
  • Keep An Open Mind
    28 September 2021

    Open your eyes to the world around you. You just may learn something. It will make your decisions better, your relationships stronger, and it will transform you into a more enlightened person. Being open-minded doesn’t require a major investment of your time but rather, a fresh new way of thinking. It requires you to be a sponge — obtaining information from various sources, seeking input from people of diverse backgrounds and viewpoints, and evaluating that input based on its merits rather than on whether it conforms to your way of thinking. Do you have an open mind?

    Open your eyes. Being open-minded helps you to:

    Expand your horizons. Challenge your thinking by embracing differing viewpoints rather than limiting debate to like-minded people.

    Enhance your decision making. Evaluate your options from every angle rather than being predisposed to one way of looking at things.

    Expand your relationships. Promote teamwork by being respectful of others’ differences rather than being judgmental and intolerant.

    Challenge the status quo. Advance positive change by encouraging debate and buy-in rather than leading by command and control.

    Build trust. Encourage fair and objective decisions rather than subjecting the process to your personal bias.

    Enrich your personal growth. Remain open-minded to personal feedback rather than repeating mistakes because you failed to learn from them.

    Find the optimum solution. Generate several good possibilities to choose from rather than settling for the first right answer.

    Obtain the truth. Search for the truth by listening to opposing arguments and letting others challenge your views and opinions.

    If being open-minded is so advantageous, why doesn’t everyone embrace it? For some folks, being closed-minded is a habit — they’re uninterested, misinformed, and dismissive of fresh viewpoints. Being closed-minded may also be the result of an entrenched mindset of intolerance or prejudice. Are you open-minded? If not, leave the door open to it.

    Do You Have An Open Mind?

    Please leave a comment and tell us what you think or share it with someone who can benefit from the information.

    Additional Reading:
    How Do You React to Negative Feedback?
    How to Have a Fresh Perspective
    Are You Open- Or Closed-Minded?
    Great Things Start With Great Expectations
    Should Your Viewpoint Matter More than Mine?
    You Be the Judge

    If you like this article, subscribe to our blog so that you don’t miss a single post. Get future posts by RSS feed, or Facebook. It’s FREE.

    The post Keep An Open Mind appeared first on Frank Sonnenberg Online.

  • Book Driving Test Cancellations with Your Instructor Help Always
    28 September 2021

    Everyone seeks an early date for a driving test. But in the worst case, they get failed in the first attempt, and then they will book another date for the driving test. DVSA assign the next date after 6 to 7 months; that’s a long period. The best way to get an early driving test is to book driving test cancellations. Discuss your matter with your instructor and always book driving test cancellations with your instructor help because instructors are experienced people, and they know how to get the right date for your next driving test.

    How to Book Driving Test Cancellations in the United Kingdom?

    Some people can’t manage to wait for the long date given by DVSA because of their tough routine,, so they search for early bookings. Also, some students who get failed in their first attempt search for the next attempt, and DVSA assign them next dates after 6 to 7 months that’s tough to wait. Then my most sincere suggestion is to get driving test cancellations. Just book driving test cancellations, and you will get an early date for your driving test. Many websites are working in the United Kingdom. These websites keep searching for cancellations slots the whole day and keep refreshing their page after every one minute to not let any cancellations skip. As it’s difficult for a person to go to a website after every minute to search for cancellations, that’s why do these websites keep searching for cancellations with their automation bots, and when they find a free slot, they book it for their client. And if the found slot doesn’t match with the client’s schedule, they simply ignore it and begin to find another one. The process keeps running until they get a perfect slot for their client. And then they book it for their customers. I got this experience with Test Swap when I was looking for an early driving test. So Test Swap book driving test cancellations for me, and it became very easy for me to perform my driving test early, and I had not to wait for too long.

    Why Would Candidates Search for Early Driving Test Cancellations Booking?

    There lie two categories of candidates, the first one is those candidates who get failed in the first attempt of driving test because of some mistakes, and now they are looking for another chance, but the dates given by DVSA for the second attempt are so long like 6 to 7 months that’s very difficult to wait for this long. There are very well-experienced and trained instructors who take these tests and do not let happen even a minor mistake. They observe even small details, and the examiner with the candidate in the car obverse every move very keenly. And the second category lies are those who couldn’t manage to get long dates because of their tough lifestyle and busy routine. They have to go to their workplaces and are so busy that they can’t come and perform dates given DVSA, so they search for a date according to their schedule. That’s why they seek early driving tests. So the easiest way to get an early booking is to get cancellations.

    Which is the Best Website to Book Driving Test Cancellations in the United Kingdom?

    Test swap is one of the best websites to book driving test cancellations in the United Kingdom. Their automation bot keeps searching for cancellations and books the perfect slot for their candidates. So if you are looking to book driving test cancellations earlier, I highly recommend test swap. Get the best services of test swap for booking of driving test cancellations in a maximum of two days. I 100% guaranteed that you will not regret your decision of working with Test Swap ever.

  • Our Deepest Fear: Reboot
    28 September 2021

    I’m taking one of Marianne Williamson’s greatest quotes, in my perspective, to the next level with a (r)evolution of bliss. Let’s go!

    Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. It is our light not our darkness that most frightens us.

    Marianne Williamson

    Another way to say this? It is our bliss not our despair that frightens us most. Wild, huh? Well, let’s go deeper…

    No matter how much we struggle with our “bad” circumstances in life, i.e., how we struggle with money or lack of, with our outward appearances, with addiction or recovery, with mental illness or mental health, with physical impairment, physical illness or western medicine and its medical systems; what we are more frightened of is not all of that. These are the struggles that people document all day everyday – in books, in newspapers, on the news, in talk shows, on social media, on Thrive Global and others like it. All we have to do is look around us and we can pull what we need to illumine our path and find our way. Everybody is doing some version of this. However, bliss… who knows what the hell that looks like? (And I don’t mean bliss from a drug or any other external factor… that’s not bliss. Frankly? That’s more of despair.)

    We are more frightened by the bliss we would dare to experience if we simply surrendered to what’s within us. “Surrender? You say, surrender? That’s a frightening proposition!” 

    Bliss is our natural state. It is who we are. But we have very little idea of what that means, of what that looks like – living from the state of bliss. Who can tell us what to expect? And are they legitimate or just fakin’ it? Probably they’re not real, because real people have problems… and lots of them. We. are. not. comfortable. with. life. being. that. good… or that easy. Frankly, who would we be if we didn’t have the upheaval, the deprivation, the chaos? And if we can’t see it in front of us, then we’ll deny it as our birthright. We’ll deny that no battles are necessary to have this type of happiness, this type of bliss – this bliss that is the very nature of our souls.

    In the end, we would feel better if we had to do something to earn it, do something to be worthy of it, or do something to fight for it. That is our learned default.

    We ask ourselves, who am I to be brilliant, gorgeous, talented, fabulous? Actually, who are you not to be?

    We wonder if we are enough when we are just ourselves, and no more. We compare ourselves to others trying to judge if we are enough, if we have enough, if we feel enough, if we sense enough, if we know enough, if we shine bright enough, if we can learn enough, if we… you can finish that for me. We find all sorts of ways to add more to who we are, and we are rarely satisfied with life as it happens to us.

    It is so not a problem to want more – in fact, want it all! Just don’t feel the need to make wrong, thereby scrubbing, what’s already before you – what you’ve already done. Downplaying who we are or who we have been is acceptable, even admired, as self-deprecation, and we feed our need to seem like less so that we don’t ruffle any feathers around us.

    You are a child of God. Your playing small does not serve the world. There is nothing enlightened about shrinking so that other people won’t feel insecure around you.

    I’ll say it again… Downplaying who we are is an acceptable, and lauded, mode of self-deprecation. You can’t just say how great you are, you have to offset it with a remark against how it might be perceived by others thereby making it more acceptable to say. Whose standard of acceptability is that?

    We dive so deep into the delusional fear that our egos will take us over, become unruly and then we’ll lose ourselves in the presupposed darkness that we forget to simply revel in the light of who we are right now.

    We forget that it’s okay to revel in who we are. We’re unsure because we don’t want to look like fools; but what we don’t know is that this very act is our “shrinking so that other[s] won’t feel insecure.”

    Copyright © 2021 the revolution of bliss – all rights reserved
    September 28, 2021
  • No Two Alike
    28 September 2021

    Today, I’ve asked Kathryn Paige Harden to share her tip of the week. 

    I know a family where neither parent could read music or play an instrument. But that didn’t stop them from buying a piano. “With eight kids, at least one person was going to be musical,” the mother predicted. She was right: The sixth child became an avid pianist.

    Most of us don’t have eight children, so we might not be confronted quite as starkly with the incredible range of traits and talents that can pop up in a single family. Shrinking families have shrunk our imaginations about the sheer magnitude of genetic diversity that is lurking within our bodies. 

    But consider this: Every time a pair of parents conceives a child, there are 70 trillion different combinations of DNA that they could pass on to that child. That’s more than the number of stars in the galaxy. Although you may know your partner intimately, you can’t predict what’s going to happen when your DNA recombines with theirs. The possible outcomes of the genetic lottery are too myriad to be fully knowable.

    As a behavioral geneticist, I study the effects of that genetic lottery on how children grow and develop. And it turns out, genetic differences between siblings influence nearly every aspect of how they think, feel, learn, and behave. We see evidence even for things like how well children do in school, their tendency to spend or save money, and how happy they are with their lives.   

    Of course, genes don’t determine these life outcomes. The environment—ranging from access to clean drinking water to having a close relationship with a teacher—has a profound influence on a child’s life, regardless of their genetic makeup. 

    Nonetheless, as a mother, recognizing the power of genes can be unnerving: My children’s genetic uniqueness is one vitally important aspect of their lives that I couldn’t predict or plan for. At the same time, I get to be curious about the people I gave birth to. Who are these people, and what singular gifts and talents might they have that no one else in the family shares? Being a geneticist reminds me that my children are not mini-mes; they are fully their own people.   

    Don’t assume that your children will be just like you, their other parent, or each other—especially in their personalities. In fact, scientific evidence shows that siblings are as alike in personality as two people randomly picked out of the population—which is to say, not at all!

    Do think of parenting as going on a treasure hunt. If you stay curious and open-minded, you may discover your child’s unique talents—and then you can provide an environment to help them flourish.

    With curiosity and gratitude,

    Paige

    Kathryn Paige Harden is a professor of psychology at the University of Texas at Austin, where she directs the Developmental Behavior Genetics lab and codirects the Texas Twin Project. She is the author of The Genetic Lottery: Why DNA Matters for Social Equality.

    Originally published on Character Lab.

  • Most Of Us Are Learning the Wrong Lessons From TV
    28 September 2021

    Given how popular hospital shows are and given that for many of us, they are the only experience of emergency medicine short of actually being in an emergency room (ER), we should examine how closely these shows follow reality. 

    Researchers went over 269 episodes of Grey’s Anatomy and matched each fictional trauma that was portrayed on the show with actual patients who had incurred such a trauma. As expected, TV events unfolded faster and more dramatically than events in real life: most TV patients (71 percent) went straight from the emergency department to the operating room, whereas only 25 percent do so in real life. TV patients were more likely to die, and while half of severely wounded TV patients were hospitalized for less than a week, only 20 percent of real-life patients were so lucky. The researchers worried that the television portrayal of rapid recovery after major injury would “cultivate false expectations among patients and their families.” 

    The fascination with medicine on TV continues. Susan Diem, an internist, and her colleagues watched every episode of ER and Chicago Hope during the 1994–1995 viewing season and fifty consecutive episodes of Rescue 911 broadcast over a three-month period in 1995. (Why doesn’t my own research involve curling up on the sofa in front of George Clooney, who was on ER that season?) 

    Diem examined how television depicted medicine, specifically CPR. This emergency procedure involves chest compressions performed when a person’s heart has stopped beating, preserving brain function until an electric shock can be applied to the heart to restart it. You’ve seen that on TV: the doctor yells “Clear!” and applies a powerful shock to the patient’s chest. Of course, Diem did more than curl up on the sofa and watch. First, she counted: CPR appeared eleven times in Chicago Hope, eighteen in Rescue 911, and as many as thirty-one times in twenty-five episodes of ER. Television was giving us a course in CPR, the only course in CPR most of us would ever get. But how accurate was this televised education? 

    For the sake of science, I sacrifice an afternoon and looked up resuscitation scenes from ER. The first to come up was season 7, episode 11, where John Truman Carter III, a slim medical student in his twenties, lay on an ER table, his chest bare. His heart stops beating so, by the book, he receives ventilation via his mouth and his heart is manually compressed. But we have seen enough television to know that more is required. A young doctor in a gray T-shirt shows up, grabs the defibrillator, and yells, “Clear!” it happens repeatedly, the doctor relentless in his defibrillation attempts. Within a few seconds, Carter comes to. His eyes still shut, he smiles coyly. “Of course. You saved me,” he tells the doctor. 

    They look more like frat boys after a successful prank than a physician and the patient he has brought back from the dead. It seems as if within an hour, Carter will bounce off the table, and the two will head to the nearest keg party. 

    This is typical of television, where 65 percent of cardiac arrests occur in children, teenagers, or young adults. This is not, however, the typical profile of patients who require CPR in real life. Compared with real-life resuscitated patients, television patients requiring CPR were usually younger, had fewer background illnesses, and tended to suffer more exotic afflictions—they had nearly drowned, had been shot, or had been struck by lightning. 

    The reality is not as pretty as it looks on TV. The chances that the rescuer will break ribs, break the sternum, or rupture the liver or the spleen during the procedure, or that the patient will develop an infection following CPR, are high. The odds of surviving after CPR are low, as the medical staff cannot necessarily address the cause of the cardiac arrest. CPR’s dire aftermath is not what you see on television. 

    Diem found that on Rescue 911, every single CPR case was a success. Ten were described as miracles. We should not be surprised—it’s showbiz. In real life, however, most CPR patients are older and are already hospitalized. They have a 40 percent chance of short-term survival following CPR, as opposed to the 75 percent portrayed on TV. Their long-term survival rate—the patients’ chance of being discharged from the hospital after CPR—is half of the 67 percent that’s shown on television. Most real patients receiving CPR, those who were hospitalized to begin with, would remain in their pajamas and hospital beds long after the doctor yelled, “Clear.” 

    As Diem and her colleagues revealed, it was hard to infer anything about real life from television. The TV–real life gap is all the more alarming given that television is one of people’s main information sources about hospitals and medicine. 

    Television programs are important storytelling mechanisms. And we all love a good story—so much, that people worldwide spend, on average, 167 minutes (nearly three hours) a day watching TV. Americans dedicate four and a half hours a day to television and streaming services, and seniors watch for more than seven hours a day. The stories we watch seep into our minds, just like the fairy tales we hear over and over again that “teach” us that women need to be rescued by princes. 

    We all know that television shows like ER and its contemporaries are a touched-up presentation of reality. Even Rescue 911, which offers dramatic reenactments of real rescues by emergency services, chooses what to leave out. And yet Susan Diem and her coauthors are concerned that the public does not distinguish fact from fiction. It’s the very realism of these television programs that makes them attractive. 

    Heavy viewers of crime shows think that crime and violence happen frequently. Heavy viewers of medical dramas underestimate how serious cancer and cardiovascular disease are. They are fatalistic about having to take care of such issues, because so many people die of illness on TV. Watching quasi-scientific shows can “teach” you about the world. Half the studies that examined TV viewers’ postviewing knowledge found that people learned correct health information. The other half had negative or mixed outcomes. 

    Seeing is believing. What the psychology of persuasion calls the “sleeper effect” is at play here. Even if we get a signal that a message isn’t credible, over time we increasingly ignore that signal and remember the message without questioning it. In the health context, the sleeper effect means that when we watch ads or TV or read antivax Facebook posts, we receive messages that may not be credible, but over time, we will accept those messages as valid.

    The portrayal of a miraculous end to a dangerous and painful procedure caters to our intuitive, quick, and emotional way of thinking, our System 1 thinking. The fact-checking, deliberative way of thinking, our System 2, is often left out of the picture. And when we fear for our life or the life of a loved one, it’s easy to resort to what was so vivid on TV, letting it guide our decision-making. After all, a miraculous resuscitation on TV is more convincing than dry statistics, which we don’t have access to and may not be able to understand even if we did. 

    I would venture to guess that many of us don’t separate what we “know” about CPR from where we learned it. If we don’t question this “knowledge” or seek more validated information, then the next logical step is to opt for CPR in real life, expecting its outcomes to be the same as seen on TV. 

    Some researchers actually asked, in relation to CPR on television, “Are we miseducating the public?”37 e answer was yes. They surveyed people on the practice of CPR (how deeply one needed to compress and at what rate). Those who reported watching medical dramas regularly had poorer knowledge than those who only watched them occasionally. 

    CPR is not the only medical subject where TV is misleading. A review of almost twenty papers explored what people learn from television about cancer screening, sexually transmitted infections, heart disease, and more. After watching TV, a third of viewers knew more and were more likely to engage in desirable health behaviors. A few acquired inaccurate knowledge and faulty health practices. And for more than half the views, the effect was mixed. As researcher Beth Ho man told me, television viewing is associated with real-world outcomes. 

    To test whether people really base their decisions on fictional characters and overly optimistic depictions of resuscitation, we would have to design an experiment that manipulates how CPR is portrayed on TV. We would then record their resuscitation decisions and learn how television influenced their perceptions and choices. at is impractical. It’s equally impractical to expect television to fully reflect reality. 

    A more practical proposal is to use TV, an easy, accessible, and visual medium, to convey critical information to the public, regardless of health literacy level. Rather than using TV to provide inaccurate albeit sticky facts, we can use it to convey accurate data in a sticky way.

    Excerpted from Your Life Depends on It: What You Can Do to Make Better Choices About Your Health by Talya Miron-Shatz. Copyright © 2021. Available from Basic Books, an imprint of Hachette Book Group, Inc. 
  • How You Can Steal the System Used by Google and Amazon to Grow Your Business
    28 September 2021

Life

Life Blogs

28 September 2021

Life Blogs
  • Does Taking Turmeric for Inflammation Work?
    28 September 2021

    The story of turmeric is fascinating and magnificent. While this unique spice is integral in the various indigenous cultures around the globe, the Western world has only recently woken up to its possible health benefits. Suddenly, turmeric is everywhere in our milk, lattes, cereals, supplements, and personal care products.

    Turmeric is touted as a natural and healthy remedy for lessening infection, reducing inflammation, and boosting immunity. Is turmeric the magic pill for all of our health problems?

    In this article, we focus on turmeric or—as the Western world calls it—curcumin pills and their role as a remedy for inflammation in this article. So, let’s dig in deeper to understand this unique spice, its benefits and risks, and the safest ways to consume it for your health.

    Turmeric—More Than a Golden Spice

    Here are some quick and interesting facts about turmeric:[1]

    • Turmeric is predominantly grown and used in parts of Asia like India and Central America.
    • It is also known as the Golden Spice or Indian Saffron.
    • Turmeric is a dried rhizome (roots of a flowering plant) remotely related to the ginger family.
    • It has a bitter, pungent taste and a distinctive deep yellow shade.
    • Turmeric is an integral part of many industries, such as health, beauty, pharmaceuticals, food and beverage, and textiles and apparel.
    • Dried turmeric roots are sold commercially as tablets, gels, capsules, powders, teas, and extracts.
    Does Turmeric Work as a Health Remedy?

    For its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, turmeric is a staple ingredient in some Eastern cuisines and Ayurveda, a traditional Indian medicine system. In the ancient Ayurvedic medicine system, turmeric is used for internal and external inflammation, treating various conditions from chronic pain to rheumatism.

    Recent studies in the Western world have explored and studied the anti-inflammatory properties of turmeric as a potential remedy for several conditions. Turmeric’s superpowers come mainly from the polyphenol curcumin, its main active ingredient.[2] Curcumin has natural antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. This is a big deal because inflammation is a contributing factor in several chronic conditions.[3]

    Curcumin targets multiple signaling molecules, blocking and suppressing the activation of the NF-κB (Nuclear Factor Kappa-Light-Chain-Enhancer of Activated B cells) or the target genes responsible for the development and progression of inflammation at the cellular level.[4] This phenomenon could be a reason curcumin plays a beneficial role in several medical conditions.

    Turmeric’s potential health benefits include reducing the risk of:

    • Arthritis: Turmeric can reduce symptoms of arthritis, such as joint pain and swelling by blocking inflammatory cytokines and enzymes, as suggested by some studies.[5]
    • Digestion: Turmeric is used in some traditional Eastern cuisines to aid digestion. It can help with various digestive problems, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). However, more research is needed to confirm turmeric’s beneficial role in digestive disorders.[6]
    • Cancer: The anti-inflammatory properties of turmeric may help prevent tumor growth that leads to various cancers and multiple myeloma. However, these research studies are still evolving and not conclusive.[7]
    • Diabetes: Recent studies suggest curcumin can prevent and treat Type 2 diabetes and its associated disorders with its therapeutic properties.[8] However, given the complexity of diabetes, more studies are required to come to a definite conclusion on turmeric’s role in diabetes prevention and management.
    • Lung disease: Some studies suggest that turmeric reduces inflammation, boosts immunity, fights allergies, and improves chronic lung diseases such as asthma. According to a research study, curcumin is a safe add-on therapy in treating lung diseases, but it could interfere with certain medications and treatments.[9] Although the results are encouraging, we need more research to establish curcumin as an effective remedy for bronchial asthma and other chronic lung conditions.

    Turmeric may also improve:

    • Brain Health: There are research studies that suggest curcumin can help prevent several conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease, dementia, depression, brain degeneration, and other age-related conditions.[10] These studies were conducted on small sample size. More research is required on a larger sample size to be conclusive.
    • Skin Health: Turmeric may help prevent and treat several skin conditions because of its anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antimicrobial properties.[11] Some skin conditions that it may relieve are acne, psoriasis, and eczema.[12] However, it’s important to be cautious of turmeric as it can be a contact allergen and have adverse effects on your skin.[13] There are reports of contact dermatitis after curcumin application on the skin. Further studies are required to cite turmeric as a remedy for chronic skin conditions. While turmeric can be good for your skin with its antioxidant and anti-inflammation properties, it is also an allergen, and it should be used with caution.

    In addition to the above conditions, turmeric can potentially prevent and treat other conditions such as pancreatitis.[14] However, more research is required. Scientists are still figuring out what turmeric can or cannot prevent and treat with its anti-inflammatory properties.

    How Turmeric Helps to Fight Inflammation

    With its anti-inflammatory properties, turmeric can relieve some symptoms of chronic conditions. Still, it is not a substitute for a healthy lifestyle, comprising diet, nutrition, and your doctor’s prescribed treatment.

    There are three challenges to researching the health benefits of turmeric to fight inflammation:[15]

    1. Curcumin is unstable and changes into other substances easily, making it difficult to attribute the results.
    2. Curcumin products vary in their composition, and thus, the study results may not be consistent and accurate.
    3. Curcumin has therapeutic properties, but it has poor bioavailability, which means when taken orally, not much of it reaches your bloodstream. Pairing turmeric with bioavailability enhancers such as piperine in pepper increases its bioavailability by 2000%. However, more research is required to suggest curcumin as an effective remedy for pro-inflammatory diseases.[16][17]

    The increasing use of turmeric as self-medication is based on the misconception that natural means safe. Just because turmeric is natural does not mean it has no side effects or is entirely safe for everyone’s consumption. Caffeine, tobacco, and arsenic are natural, but they can have harmful side effects.

    Another major concerning factor is the lack of regulation, transparency, testing, and accountability in traditional medicine systems and commercial supplements. There is no regulation of supplements by the US Food and Drug Administration currently.

    Turmeric is certainly not a substitute treatment or cure for chronic conditions like diabetes or cancer.[18] On the contrary, it can be harmful and aggravate your condition based on how much you consume.

    Some side effects of turmeric are listed below.

    • Turmeric is high in oxalate, which can bind with calcium and form kidney stones in your body.[19]
    • Turmeric can cleanse your blood and can make you prone to excessive bleeding.[20]
    • Its consumption can interfere with certain medications such as certain blood-thinners and antacids.

    People undergoing surgery and those with the following health conditions should use turmeric with caution or avoid it:

    • Liver and gallbladder issues
    • Bleeding disorders
    • Diabetes
    • Gastroesophageal reflux disorder (GERD)
    • Heart arrhythmia

    Some curcumin supplements contain a higher dose of curcumin extracts and are not recommended for the following groups.

    • Pregnant women as it raises the risk of pregnancy-related complications
    • Nursing women[21]
    • People with iron deficiencies because curcumin can reduce iron absorption[22]

    Hence, you should practice caution and always consult your primary care doctor first before using turmeric as a remedy for inflammation and chronic conditions.

    How to Take Turmeric for Inflammation Safely

    Turmeric has been an integral part of so many ancient cultures and medicine systems. There are certain ways to consume it safely for better health.

    1. Use Minimally

    As a rule of thumb, you should not use more than a pinch of the spice in each dish. The standard recommendation is no more than 8 grams per day.[23] High turmeric consumption can lead to acidity, bloating, nausea, headache, dizziness, rash, diarrhea, and stomach upset.[24] It can also cause further complications in people with diabetes and kidney complications. We also need further research to understand the safety of long-term usage of turmeric.

    2. Pair It With Other Foods

    Turmeric on its own has poor bioavailability and absorption. You can combine it with other foods such as pepper and ginger to improve its bioavailability. There are several creative ways to pair this spice with other foods in your diet. Consider adding it to powders, smoothies, chutneys, curries, soups, eggs, muffins, rice, meat, seafood, and vegetables.

    3. Buy Minimal Quantity

    Turmeric can lose its potency if constantly exposed to air. So, it’s a wise practice to shop for turmeric in small amounts and store it in a cool, dark place.

    4. Choose Supplements Wisely

    Not all turmeric supplements are made the same. Choose those which are manufactured with “phytosome technology” as they have greater absorption compared to the other curcumin extracts and with the USP verified mark.[25] However, since there are no regulations on supplements, you must first talk to your doctor before starting a turmeric supplement and check its interference with your current medications.[26]

    5. Don’t Use Turmeric as a Substitute for Your Doctor’s Medications

    The last but most crucial point is that turmeric is not a substitute for your prescribed medications. Turmeric’s therapeutic properties may bring relief to some of the symptoms of your chronic condition, but it cannot entirely manage or cure it.

    Does Taking Turmeric for Inflammation Really Work?

    Turmeric has antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antimicrobial properties. Further research and evidence are needed before we can come to a definitive conclusion and recommend it as a potential remedy for inflammation, which, in turn, may lead to chronic conditions.[27][28]

    However, when used in the recommended safe quantities, there is no harm in using turmeric to relieve minor conditions such as cold and cough and minor symptoms of chronic disease. If you have chronic conditions, it’s best to check with your doctor first about the recommended usage and its compatibility with your current medications.

    More About Turmeric

    Featured photo credit: Prachi Palwe via unsplash.com

    Reference
    [1] ^ NCBI: Curcumin: A Review of Its’ Effects on Human Health
    [2] ^ NCBI: Curcumin: A Review of Its’ Effects on Human Health
    [3] ^ Harvard Health Publishing: Understanding acute and chronic inflammation
    [4] ^ NCBI: Inhibition of the NF-κB signaling pathway by the curcumin analog, 3,5-Bis(2-pyridinylmethylidene)-4-piperidone (EF31): anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties
    [5] ^ NCBI: Curcumin: A Review of Its’ Effects on Human Health
    [6] ^ NCBI: Therapeutic Roles of Curcumin: Lessons Learned from Clinical Trials
    [7] ^ NCBI: Curcumin and Cancer
    [8] ^ NCBI: Curcumin and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Prevention and Treatment
    [9] ^ NCBI: Evaluation of Efficacy of Curcumin as an Add-on Therapy in Patients of Bronchial Asthma
    [10] ^ NCBI: Diverse effects of a low dose supplement of lipidated curcumin in healthy middle-aged people
    [11] ^ PubMed.gov: Effects of Turmeric (Curcuma longa) on Skin Health: A Systematic Review of the Clinical Evidence
    [12] ^ NCBI: Use of Curcumin in Psoriasis
    [13] ^ NCBI: Curcumin
    [14] ^ NCBI: Curcumin Attenuates Inflammation in a Severe Acute Pancreatitis Animal Model by Regulating TRAF1/ASK1 Signaling
    [15] ^ National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health: Turmeric
    [16] ^ NCBI: Curcumin, Inflammation, and Chronic Diseases: How Are They Linked?
    [17] ^ NCBI: Therapeutic Roles of Curcumin: Lessons Learned from Clinical Trials
    [18] ^ ACS Publications: The Essential Medicinal Chemistry of Curcumin
    [19] ^ PubMed.gov: Effect of cinnamon and turmeric on urinary oxalate excretion, plasma lipids, and plasma glucose in healthy subjects
    [20] ^ MayClinic: Primary Care in Rochester and Kasson
    [21] ^ NCBI: Turmeric
    [22] ^ NCBI: Iron Deficiency Anemia Due to High-dose Turmeric
    [23] ^ Mayo Clinic: Mayo Clinic Minute: Are there health benefits to taking turmeric?
    [24] ^ NCBI: Curcumin: A Review of Its’ Effects on Human Health
    [25] ^ NCBI: Therapeutic Roles of Curcumin: Lessons Learned from Clinical Trials
    [26] ^ NCBI: Curcuminoid content and safety-related markers of quality of turmeric dietary supplements sold in an urban retail marketplace in the United States
    [27] ^ Mayo Clinic: Primary Care in Rochester and Kasson
    [28] ^ National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health: Turmeric

    The post Does Taking Turmeric for Inflammation Work? appeared first on Lifehack.

  • Benefits of Smiling: Simples Ways To Make Someone Smile
    28 September 2021

    Thoughts on Life and Love Thoughts on Life and Love - Mandy Kloppers - Psychologist (CBT) -Counseling in Guildford, Surrey.UK.

    “Every time you smile at someone, it is an action of love, a gift to that person, a beautiful thing.” – Mother Theresa Indeed it …

    Benefits of Smiling: Simples Ways To Make Someone Smile Mandy Kloppers.

  • See Peter Gallagher & Daughter Kathryn on the Tony Awards Red Carpet
    28 September 2021
    <p>On Sunday night, <strong>Kathryn Gallagher</strong> was up for her first Tony Award. So, naturally, she invited a date who has some familiarity with the experience: her dad. <a href="https://people.com/theater/peter-gallagher-accompanies-daughter-kathryn-gallagher-first-tony-awards/" >Kathryn is actor <strong>Peter Gallagher</strong>'s daughter</a>, and they've both been <a href="https://bestlifeonline.com/surprising-emmy-winners/" >nominated</a> for their stage work, 35 years apart. In 1986, Peter was nominated for Best Featured Actor in a Play. At this year's show, Kathryn was nominated for Best Featured Actress in a Musical.</p> <p>The father-daughter pair walked the red carpet together before taking in the show, and it looks like they had a great time. Kathryn might not have won her award, but according to a post on her Instagram, it was still a fun night. Read on to see Kathryn and Peter at the Tonys and to find out more about their theater careers and their relationship.</p> <p ><strong>RELATED: <a href="https://bestlifeonline.com/celebrities-related/" >13 Celebrities You Had No Idea Were Related</a>.</strong></p> <div > <h2 > <div ></div> <div >Kathryn was nominated for her performance in <em>Jagged Little Pill</em>.</div> </h2> </div> <p><img decoding="async" src="https://bestlifeonline.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2021/09/Kathryn-Peter-Tonys-1.jpg?quality=82&strip=all&w=500" alt="Kathryn and Peter Gallagher at the 2021 Tonys on September 26, 2021" width="500" height="704" /></p> <p>Kathryn's nomination was for her role as Bella Fox in the musical <em>Jagged Little Pill</em>, which features songs from <strong>Alanis Morissette</strong>'s 1995 album of the same name. The 28-year-old previously appeared on Broadway in<em> Spring Awakening</em> and was also in the Off-Broadway play <em>Dust Can't Kill Me</em>. Like her father, she's worked on TV, too, appearing on <em>You</em> and<em> The Flash</em>. She and her <em>Jagged Little Pill </em>co-stars won the 2021 Grammy for Best Musical Theater Album.</p> <div > <h2 > <div ></div> <div >Kathryn lost out to one of her co-stars.</div> </h2> </div> <p><img decoding="async" src="https://bestlifeonline.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2021/09/Kathryn-Peter-Tonys-2.jpg?quality=82&strip=all&w=500" alt="Kathryn and Peter Gallagher at the Tonys on September 26, 2021" width="500" height="333" /></p> <p>Kathryn was nominated for Best Featured Actress in a Musical alongside her <em>Jagged Little Pill</em> co-stars <strong>Lauren Patten</strong> and <strong>Celia Rose Gooding</strong>, <em>Moulin Rouge!</em>'s <strong>Robyn Hurder</strong>, and <em>Tina</em>'s <strong>Myra Lucretia Taylor</strong>. Patten ended up taking home the award, and in her speech <a href="https://people.com/theater/lauren-patten-thanks-trans-and-non-binary-colleagues-at-tonys-amid-jagged-little-pill-backlash/" >referenced an ongoing controversy</a> regarding the gender identity of her character. In an earlier form of the show, the character was non-binary but is now depicted as a cis woman. Patten is also cisgender. Ahead of the Tonys, nominee Gooding, who isn't returning to the show when it resumes post-shutdown, <a href="https://deadline.com/2021/09/jagged-little-pill-celia-rose-gooding-nora-schell-broadway-harm-trans-non-binary-community-tony-awards-1234844029/" >released a statement</a> saying that <em>Jagged Little Pill </em>has harmed "the trans and non-binary community."</p> <p>Meanwhile, there were no hard feelings from Kathryn regarding her loss. Along with some photos of herself posting in her red Derek Lam gown, she <a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CUVltANp0UT/" >wrote on Instagram</a>, "The last time I got a solo nomination for anything was most improved player for The Moonlights AYSO soccer team Circa 1998, losing this one was a lot more fun. Thank you for a special night, @TheTonyAwards."</p> <p ><strong>For more celebrity news delivered right to your inbox, <a href="https://bestlifeonline.com/newsletters/" >sign up for our daily newsletter</a>.</strong></p> <div > <h2 > <div ></div> <div >Peter celebrates his daughter's success.</div> </h2> </div> <p><img decoding="async" src="https://bestlifeonline.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2021/09/Peter-Kathryn-Paula.jpg?quality=82&strip=all&w=500" alt="Peter Gallagher, Kathryn Gallagher, and Paula Harwood at the after party for the opening night of "Jagged Little Pill" in December 2019" width="500" height="343" /></p> <p>In addition to supporting her at the Tonys, Peter has been cheering for his daughter throughout her career. In December 2019, the <em>O.C.</em> actor <a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B5tMjh5HMe8/" >posted on Instagram</a> about the opening night of<em> Jagged Little Pill</em> and shared a photo of Kathryn when she was little. He wrote, "Sitting here with fingers and everything else crossed, a full heart and grateful for life's grand adventure that should bring this little girl's parents to her opening night tonight on Broadway in the truly wonderful new musical<em> Jagged Little Pill</em>!"</p> <p>The next day, he also <a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B5vGz49HtSw/" >shared a photo</a> of himself and wife<strong> Paula Harwood</strong> after the show's premiere with their daughter. In addition to Kathryn, the couple also have a son named <strong>James</strong>.</p> <div > <h2 > <div ></div> <div >He was nominated for his Tony 35 years ago.</div> </h2> </div> <p><img decoding="async" src="https://bestlifeonline.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2021/09/Kathryn-Peter-Tonys-3.jpg?quality=82&strip=all&w=500" alt="Kathryn and Peter Gallagher at the Tonys on September 26, 2021" width="500" height="751" /></p> <p>Peter was nominated for the Tony for Best Featured Actor in a Play in 1986 for his role as Edmund Tyrone in <em>Long Day's Journey Into Night</em>. The winner that year was <strong>John Mahoney</strong> for <em>The House of Blue Leaves</em>. Since then, 66-year-old Gallagher has continued to appear on stage in between his film and TV work, including in the musicals <em>Guys and Dolls</em> and<em> On the Twentieth Century</em>.</p> <p ><strong>RELATED: <a href="https://bestlifeonline.com/michael-j-foxs-kids-news/" >See Michael J. Fox's 4 Kids All Grown Up</a>.</strong></p>

    The post See Peter Gallagher & Daughter Kathryn on the Tony Awards Red Carpet appeared first on Best Life.

  • How to Stop Spotify From Draining Your iPhone Battery
    28 September 2021

    In recent years, the iPhone has developed a reputation for having solid battery life. In fact, critics recently singled out the batteries on the entire iPhone 13 lineup as among those devices’ best new features. You would be forgiven for thinking the opposite, however, if you’re a heavy Spotify user, as it appears the…

    Read more...

  • 9 Mindless Habits That Are Exhausting You (and How to Fix Them)
    28 September 2021

    One of the toughest parts about being an adult is dealing with the constant exhaustion. There are the obvious reasons we’re perpetually tired—for starters, we’re all stressed and sleep-deprived—but in addition to some of the more obvious reasons, some of our more mindless habits may also be adding to our exhaustion in…

    Read more...

  • How to Save on Priority Mail If You're Incredibly Cheap
    28 September 2021

    Pssst—hey, kid. Do you want to save fifty cents every time you mail something from the post office? You do? Then gather ‘round and listen closely.

    Read more...

  • These Are the Only States Where COVID Cases Are Still Rising
    28 September 2021
    <p>For the past two weeks, COVID-19 infections have been decreasing on a national level after a surge that lasted for most of the summer. But the Delta variant responsible for the months-long spike in numbers is still affecting certain areas, with some states still showing COVID cases rising amid the overall decline.</p> <p>The daily national new case average has <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2020/national/coronavirus-us-cases-deaths/" >decreased significantly in the past seven days</a>, dropping 16 percent to 35 reported cases per 100,000 people according to data from <em>The Washington Post</em> as of Sept. 28. But not all areas of the U.S. are seeing the same level of progress for the time being, with some states still feeling an <a href="https://thehill.com/policy/healthcare/573897-more-hospitals-forced-to-ration-care-amid-delta-surge" >intense strain on their healthcare system</a> and medical resources.</p> <p>During an interview with CNN on Sept. 26, <strong>Scott Gottlieb</strong>, MD, former commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), said he believes the Delta surge is finally showing <a href="https://thehill.com/policy/healthcare/574066-gottlieb-covid-19-delta-wave-could-be-last-major-surge?rl=1" >signs of tapering off</a> and could be finished within a matter of months. "I think by Thanksgiving, it's probably going to have run its course across the whole country," he predicted. "But it's going to seep into the northern parts of the country, the Northeast a little bit later than certainly in the South but even in the Midwest."</p> <p>Fortunately, Gottlieb even went so far as to forecast that the summer surge may have been the last big spike of the pandemic. "On the back end of this Delta wave, I do think this is the last major surge of infection, barring something unexpected like a new variant coming along that pierces the immunity offered by vaccination or prior infection," he said.</p> <p>Read on to see the only states where COVID cases were rising over the past week as of Sept. 28, according to data from <em>The Washington Post</em>.</p> <p><strong>RELATED: <a href="https://bestlifeonline.com/news-moderna-ceo-pandemic-over/">Moderna CEO Just Predicted When the Pandemic Will Be Over for Good</a>.</strong></p> <div > <h2 > <div >6</div> <div >New Hampshire</div> </h2> </div> <p><img decoding="async" src="https://bestlifeonline.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2020/06/new-hampshire-state.jpg?quality=82&strip=all" alt="Manchester is the largest city in the state of New Hampshire and the largest city in northern New England. Manchester is known for its industrial heritage, riverside mills, affordability, and arts & cultural destination." width="1200" height="800" /></p> <ul> <li><strong>New cases in the last seven days: </strong>33 cases per 100,000 people</li> <li><strong>Percent increase in the last seven days: </strong>2 percent</li> </ul> <p>Cases in New Hampshire are up slightly over the past seven days, but state health data shows that a considerable number of cases are <a href="https://www.nhpr.org/coronavirus-updates" >affecting young people</a>. On Sept. 24, officials announced that 243 out of 740 new COVID-19 cases were in patients younger than 18 years old.</p> <div > <h2 > <div >5</div> <div >Idaho</div> </h2> </div> <p><img decoding="async" src="https://bestlifeonline.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2020/07/shutterstock_351001115.jpg?quality=82&strip=all" alt="downtown boise idaho" width="1200" height="800" /></p> <ul> <li><strong>New cases in the last seven days: </strong>69 cases per 100,000 people</li> <li><strong>Percent increase in the last seven days: </strong>3 percent</li> </ul> <p>COVID cases in Idaho may still be rising slightly, but it's also one of the states where the hospital system is past its breaking point. On Sept. 16, health officials announced the <a href="https://www.npr.org/2021/09/16/1037987107/idaho-rations-health-care-statewide-covid-19-coronavirus-hospital" >statewide expansion of care rationing</a> that allows healthcare workers to decide which patients will receive scarce medical supplies such as a ventilator or ICU bed based on their likelihood of survival. Some experts argue that the state's relatively low vaccination rate has created a <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/health/2021/09/25/idaho-funeral-homes-coronavirus/" >surge in severe cases</a> at the hands of the Delta variant.</p> <p>"Idaho is having its viral tsunami at the moment," <strong>Robert Kim-Farley</strong>, MD, an infectious-disease expert at UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, told <em>The Washington Post</em>. "I anticipate that we'll see even more deaths coming in the near future because of the fact that cases are still increasing. It's going to get worse before it gets better."</p> <p><strong>RELATED: <a href="https://bestlifeonline.com/news-covid-cases-us-delta/">99 Percent of COVID Cases in the U.S. Have This in Common, CDC Says</a>.</strong></p> <div > <h2 > <div >4</div> <div >Michigan</div> </h2> </div> <p><img decoding="async" src="https://bestlifeonline.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2020/11/detroit-michigan.jpg?quality=82&strip=all" alt="city skyline of buildings in downtown Detroit, Michigan at twilight" width="1200" height="800" /></p> <ul> <li><strong>New cases in the last seven days: </strong>34 cases per 100,000 people</li> <li><strong>Percent increase in the last seven days: </strong>4 percent</li> </ul> <p>After seeing its statewide mask mandate and restrictions on capacity and public gatherings lifted, Michigan has seen a steep rise in COVID-19 cases. Since state officials dropped the safety protocols on June 22, numbers rose from 91 new daily infections to an <a href="https://www.clickondetroit.com/news/michigan/2021/09/25/get-caught-up-how-covid-situation-has-changed-in-michigan-since-whitmer-lifted-restrictions-3-months-ago/" >average of 2,395 cases per day</a> by Sept. 20, local Detroit NBC affiliate WDIV reports.</p> <p>"We are all deeply concerned that we are going to have a fourth surge," <strong>Geneva Tatum</strong>, MD, the associate division head of pulmonary and critical care medicine at Henry Ford Health System, told WDIV. "We have seen the devastating effects that this virus has taken on the human body, including those who were otherwise healthy when they came into the hospital and thought that they didn't have to worry about being affected or infected by COVID, and thought that even if they did get infected that they'd have a relatively brief or low-symptom course. But even those patients, we've seen devastating consequences of COVID-19 disease, and all too often, too many patients who did not survive."</p> <div > <h2 > <div >3</div> <div >Minnesota</div> </h2> </div> <p><img decoding="async" src="https://bestlifeonline.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2020/10/minne.jpg?quality=82&strip=all" alt="Minnesota, downtown Minneapolis" width="1200" height="800" /></p> <ul> <li><strong>New cases in the last seven days: </strong>40 cases per 100,000 people</li> <li><strong>Percent increase in the last seven days: </strong>7 percent</li> </ul> <p>Minnesota may be one of the states where COVID cases are still rising, but local healthcare workers have noticed that one thing has changed during this phase of the pandemic: How old the patients are. The <a href="https://www.startribune.com/young-and-younger-minnesota-s-latest-covid-19-hospitalizations/600100761/" >median age of those hospitalized</a> in the state has dropped from 65 last winter to 50 since June, with a typical range of patients from 30 to 76 years old, the <em>Star Tribune</em> reports.</p> <p>"The age distribution is really different," <strong>Matthew Prekker</strong>, MD, an emergency and critical care specialist at Hennepin County Medical Center in Minneapolis, told the <em>Star Tribune</em>. "It's almost all people under 50 that we're admitting—day after day now."</p> <p><strong>RELATED: <a href="https://bestlifeonline.com/indoor-dining-booster-news/">A Virus Expert Says She Still Wouldn't Go Here—Even With a Booster</a>.</strong></p> <div > <h2 > <div >2</div> <div >North Dakota</div> </h2> </div> <p><img decoding="async" src="https://bestlifeonline.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2020/01/fargo-north-dakota.jpg?quality=82&strip=all" alt="downtown fargo and the fargo movie theater in north dakota" width="1200" height="800" /></p> <ul> <li><strong>New cases in the last seven days: </strong>69 cases per 100,000 people</li> <li><strong>Percent increase in the last seven days: </strong>12 percent</li> </ul> <p>According to state health data, cases have been <a href="https://www.kxnet.com/coronavirus/7-deaths-647-new-cases-of-covid-19-in-nd-active-cases-statewide-are-3690/" >steadily rising in North Dakota</a> since July 5. As of Sept. 24, there were 3,690 active cases in the state, which is the highest number recorded since Dec. 10.</p> <div > <h2 > <div >1</div> <div >Alaska</div> </h2> </div> <p><img decoding="async" src="https://bestlifeonline.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2020/01/sitka-alaska-aerial.jpg?quality=82&strip=all" alt="sitka alaska" width="1200" height="900" /></p> <ul> <li><strong>New cases in the last seven days: </strong>174 cases per 100,000 people</li> <li><strong>Percent increase in the last seven days: </strong>57 percent</li> </ul> <p>On Sept. 24, Alaska joined Idaho in <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2021/09/22/us/covid-alaska-hospital.html" >activating "crisis standards of care" statewide</a> as new cases and hospitalizations continue to mount. Cases in the state have increased twentyfold from the levels they were at in early July, <em>The New York Times</em> reports.</p> <p>"We're hoping that as the snow falls and we have less people visiting, those numbers will settle down," <strong>Anne Zink</strong>, MD, Alaska's chief medical officer, said in an interview on Sept. 23, while also adding that cooler weather could also drive people back into high-risk indoor group situations.</p> <p><strong>RELATED: <a href="https://bestlifeonline.com/virus-experts-dont-do-delta-news/">60 Percent of Virus Experts Wouldn't Do These 6 Things Right Now, Data Shows</a>.</strong></p>

    The post These Are the Only States Where COVID Cases Are Still Rising appeared first on Best Life.

  • Kindness An Underestimated Behavior
    28 September 2021
    Kindness is a underestimated behavior with the power to instantly produce change. Simple acts of kindness build immediate connections between people. Good feeling are experienced by the giver and receiver. Acts of kindness touch our hearts and echo in our memories. Acts of kindness serve as a reminder we are not walking alone. So, start to spread some kindness. Soon you will realize that good feelings are highly contagious. Now, that is the power. margiesdaughter.com  Help tilt the world in a better direction. It is just that simple.

    The post Kindness An Underestimated Behavior first appeared on Margie's Daughter.

  • King Wenceslas
    28 September 2021
    Most of all, he showed heartfelt concern for the poor of the realm.
  • *Verse of the Day
    28 September 2021
    Religion that God our Father accepts as pure and faultless is this: to look after orphans and widows in their distress and to keep oneself from being polluted by the world. (James […]
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Well-Being - Happiness

Happiness Blogs

28 September 2021

Happiness Blogs
  • Does Taking Turmeric for Inflammation Work?
    28 September 2021

    The story of turmeric is fascinating and magnificent. While this unique spice is integral in the various indigenous cultures around the globe, the Western world has only recently woken up to its possible health benefits. Suddenly, turmeric is everywhere in our milk, lattes, cereals, supplements, and personal care products.

    Turmeric is touted as a natural and healthy remedy for lessening infection, reducing inflammation, and boosting immunity. Is turmeric the magic pill for all of our health problems?

    In this article, we focus on turmeric or—as the Western world calls it—curcumin pills and their role as a remedy for inflammation in this article. So, let’s dig in deeper to understand this unique spice, its benefits and risks, and the safest ways to consume it for your health.

    Turmeric—More Than a Golden Spice

    Here are some quick and interesting facts about turmeric:[1]

    • Turmeric is predominantly grown and used in parts of Asia like India and Central America.
    • It is also known as the Golden Spice or Indian Saffron.
    • Turmeric is a dried rhizome (roots of a flowering plant) remotely related to the ginger family.
    • It has a bitter, pungent taste and a distinctive deep yellow shade.
    • Turmeric is an integral part of many industries, such as health, beauty, pharmaceuticals, food and beverage, and textiles and apparel.
    • Dried turmeric roots are sold commercially as tablets, gels, capsules, powders, teas, and extracts.
    Does Turmeric Work as a Health Remedy?

    For its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, turmeric is a staple ingredient in some Eastern cuisines and Ayurveda, a traditional Indian medicine system. In the ancient Ayurvedic medicine system, turmeric is used for internal and external inflammation, treating various conditions from chronic pain to rheumatism.

    Recent studies in the Western world have explored and studied the anti-inflammatory properties of turmeric as a potential remedy for several conditions. Turmeric’s superpowers come mainly from the polyphenol curcumin, its main active ingredient.[2] Curcumin has natural antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. This is a big deal because inflammation is a contributing factor in several chronic conditions.[3]

    Curcumin targets multiple signaling molecules, blocking and suppressing the activation of the NF-κB (Nuclear Factor Kappa-Light-Chain-Enhancer of Activated B cells) or the target genes responsible for the development and progression of inflammation at the cellular level.[4] This phenomenon could be a reason curcumin plays a beneficial role in several medical conditions.

    Turmeric’s potential health benefits include reducing the risk of:

    • Arthritis: Turmeric can reduce symptoms of arthritis, such as joint pain and swelling by blocking inflammatory cytokines and enzymes, as suggested by some studies.[5]
    • Digestion: Turmeric is used in some traditional Eastern cuisines to aid digestion. It can help with various digestive problems, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). However, more research is needed to confirm turmeric’s beneficial role in digestive disorders.[6]
    • Cancer: The anti-inflammatory properties of turmeric may help prevent tumor growth that leads to various cancers and multiple myeloma. However, these research studies are still evolving and not conclusive.[7]
    • Diabetes: Recent studies suggest curcumin can prevent and treat Type 2 diabetes and its associated disorders with its therapeutic properties.[8] However, given the complexity of diabetes, more studies are required to come to a definite conclusion on turmeric’s role in diabetes prevention and management.
    • Lung disease: Some studies suggest that turmeric reduces inflammation, boosts immunity, fights allergies, and improves chronic lung diseases such as asthma. According to a research study, curcumin is a safe add-on therapy in treating lung diseases, but it could interfere with certain medications and treatments.[9] Although the results are encouraging, we need more research to establish curcumin as an effective remedy for bronchial asthma and other chronic lung conditions.

    Turmeric may also improve:

    • Brain Health: There are research studies that suggest curcumin can help prevent several conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease, dementia, depression, brain degeneration, and other age-related conditions.[10] These studies were conducted on small sample size. More research is required on a larger sample size to be conclusive.
    • Skin Health: Turmeric may help prevent and treat several skin conditions because of its anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antimicrobial properties.[11] Some skin conditions that it may relieve are acne, psoriasis, and eczema.[12] However, it’s important to be cautious of turmeric as it can be a contact allergen and have adverse effects on your skin.[13] There are reports of contact dermatitis after curcumin application on the skin. Further studies are required to cite turmeric as a remedy for chronic skin conditions. While turmeric can be good for your skin with its antioxidant and anti-inflammation properties, it is also an allergen, and it should be used with caution.

    In addition to the above conditions, turmeric can potentially prevent and treat other conditions such as pancreatitis.[14] However, more research is required. Scientists are still figuring out what turmeric can or cannot prevent and treat with its anti-inflammatory properties.

    How Turmeric Helps to Fight Inflammation

    With its anti-inflammatory properties, turmeric can relieve some symptoms of chronic conditions. Still, it is not a substitute for a healthy lifestyle, comprising diet, nutrition, and your doctor’s prescribed treatment.

    There are three challenges to researching the health benefits of turmeric to fight inflammation:[15]

    1. Curcumin is unstable and changes into other substances easily, making it difficult to attribute the results.
    2. Curcumin products vary in their composition, and thus, the study results may not be consistent and accurate.
    3. Curcumin has therapeutic properties, but it has poor bioavailability, which means when taken orally, not much of it reaches your bloodstream. Pairing turmeric with bioavailability enhancers such as piperine in pepper increases its bioavailability by 2000%. However, more research is required to suggest curcumin as an effective remedy for pro-inflammatory diseases.[16][17]

    The increasing use of turmeric as self-medication is based on the misconception that natural means safe. Just because turmeric is natural does not mean it has no side effects or is entirely safe for everyone’s consumption. Caffeine, tobacco, and arsenic are natural, but they can have harmful side effects.

    Another major concerning factor is the lack of regulation, transparency, testing, and accountability in traditional medicine systems and commercial supplements. There is no regulation of supplements by the US Food and Drug Administration currently.

    Turmeric is certainly not a substitute treatment or cure for chronic conditions like diabetes or cancer.[18] On the contrary, it can be harmful and aggravate your condition based on how much you consume.

    Some side effects of turmeric are listed below.

    • Turmeric is high in oxalate, which can bind with calcium and form kidney stones in your body.[19]
    • Turmeric can cleanse your blood and can make you prone to excessive bleeding.[20]
    • Its consumption can interfere with certain medications such as certain blood-thinners and antacids.

    People undergoing surgery and those with the following health conditions should use turmeric with caution or avoid it:

    • Liver and gallbladder issues
    • Bleeding disorders
    • Diabetes
    • Gastroesophageal reflux disorder (GERD)
    • Heart arrhythmia

    Some curcumin supplements contain a higher dose of curcumin extracts and are not recommended for the following groups.

    • Pregnant women as it raises the risk of pregnancy-related complications
    • Nursing women[21]
    • People with iron deficiencies because curcumin can reduce iron absorption[22]

    Hence, you should practice caution and always consult your primary care doctor first before using turmeric as a remedy for inflammation and chronic conditions.

    How to Take Turmeric for Inflammation Safely

    Turmeric has been an integral part of so many ancient cultures and medicine systems. There are certain ways to consume it safely for better health.

    1. Use Minimally

    As a rule of thumb, you should not use more than a pinch of the spice in each dish. The standard recommendation is no more than 8 grams per day.[23] High turmeric consumption can lead to acidity, bloating, nausea, headache, dizziness, rash, diarrhea, and stomach upset.[24] It can also cause further complications in people with diabetes and kidney complications. We also need further research to understand the safety of long-term usage of turmeric.

    2. Pair It With Other Foods

    Turmeric on its own has poor bioavailability and absorption. You can combine it with other foods such as pepper and ginger to improve its bioavailability. There are several creative ways to pair this spice with other foods in your diet. Consider adding it to powders, smoothies, chutneys, curries, soups, eggs, muffins, rice, meat, seafood, and vegetables.

    3. Buy Minimal Quantity

    Turmeric can lose its potency if constantly exposed to air. So, it’s a wise practice to shop for turmeric in small amounts and store it in a cool, dark place.

    4. Choose Supplements Wisely

    Not all turmeric supplements are made the same. Choose those which are manufactured with “phytosome technology” as they have greater absorption compared to the other curcumin extracts and with the USP verified mark.[25] However, since there are no regulations on supplements, you must first talk to your doctor before starting a turmeric supplement and check its interference with your current medications.[26]

    5. Don’t Use Turmeric as a Substitute for Your Doctor’s Medications

    The last but most crucial point is that turmeric is not a substitute for your prescribed medications. Turmeric’s therapeutic properties may bring relief to some of the symptoms of your chronic condition, but it cannot entirely manage or cure it.

    Does Taking Turmeric for Inflammation Really Work?

    Turmeric has antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antimicrobial properties. Further research and evidence are needed before we can come to a definitive conclusion and recommend it as a potential remedy for inflammation, which, in turn, may lead to chronic conditions.[27][28]

    However, when used in the recommended safe quantities, there is no harm in using turmeric to relieve minor conditions such as cold and cough and minor symptoms of chronic disease. If you have chronic conditions, it’s best to check with your doctor first about the recommended usage and its compatibility with your current medications.

    More About Turmeric

    Featured photo credit: Prachi Palwe via unsplash.com

    Reference
    [1] ^ NCBI: Curcumin: A Review of Its’ Effects on Human Health
    [2] ^ NCBI: Curcumin: A Review of Its’ Effects on Human Health
    [3] ^ Harvard Health Publishing: Understanding acute and chronic inflammation
    [4] ^ NCBI: Inhibition of the NF-κB signaling pathway by the curcumin analog, 3,5-Bis(2-pyridinylmethylidene)-4-piperidone (EF31): anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties
    [5] ^ NCBI: Curcumin: A Review of Its’ Effects on Human Health
    [6] ^ NCBI: Therapeutic Roles of Curcumin: Lessons Learned from Clinical Trials
    [7] ^ NCBI: Curcumin and Cancer
    [8] ^ NCBI: Curcumin and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Prevention and Treatment
    [9] ^ NCBI: Evaluation of Efficacy of Curcumin as an Add-on Therapy in Patients of Bronchial Asthma
    [10] ^ NCBI: Diverse effects of a low dose supplement of lipidated curcumin in healthy middle-aged people
    [11] ^ PubMed.gov: Effects of Turmeric (Curcuma longa) on Skin Health: A Systematic Review of the Clinical Evidence
    [12] ^ NCBI: Use of Curcumin in Psoriasis
    [13] ^ NCBI: Curcumin
    [14] ^ NCBI: Curcumin Attenuates Inflammation in a Severe Acute Pancreatitis Animal Model by Regulating TRAF1/ASK1 Signaling
    [15] ^ National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health: Turmeric
    [16] ^ NCBI: Curcumin, Inflammation, and Chronic Diseases: How Are They Linked?
    [17] ^ NCBI: Therapeutic Roles of Curcumin: Lessons Learned from Clinical Trials
    [18] ^ ACS Publications: The Essential Medicinal Chemistry of Curcumin
    [19] ^ PubMed.gov: Effect of cinnamon and turmeric on urinary oxalate excretion, plasma lipids, and plasma glucose in healthy subjects
    [20] ^ MayClinic: Primary Care in Rochester and Kasson
    [21] ^ NCBI: Turmeric
    [22] ^ NCBI: Iron Deficiency Anemia Due to High-dose Turmeric
    [23] ^ Mayo Clinic: Mayo Clinic Minute: Are there health benefits to taking turmeric?
    [24] ^ NCBI: Curcumin: A Review of Its’ Effects on Human Health
    [25] ^ NCBI: Therapeutic Roles of Curcumin: Lessons Learned from Clinical Trials
    [26] ^ NCBI: Curcuminoid content and safety-related markers of quality of turmeric dietary supplements sold in an urban retail marketplace in the United States
    [27] ^ Mayo Clinic: Primary Care in Rochester and Kasson
    [28] ^ National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health: Turmeric

    The post Does Taking Turmeric for Inflammation Work? appeared first on Lifehack.

  • Mom’s Tour de France 7 (FGK 98)
    28 September 2021

    October 16, Tours, France

    Hi Everyone:

    It hardly seems a month since I left. So much has happened to me since then that it seems longer. Perhaps if you are still getting the New York Times you saw that we had our opening last week. Saturday afternoon there was a ceremony in the town hall. All the local dignitaries were there plus the US Ambassador, President Stirling, and representatives of the French Government. There was an academic procession and many long flowery speeches in French most of which I couldn’t understand.

    After this we had a reception at the Centre at which we students were the hosts. It was my first cocktail party in French and after 3 hours of standing and talking to all sorts of people I thought I’d never be able to speak the language again. We served champagne and some of those divine pastries. It was 10 pm before all the guests left and we students were able to go and have some dinner at the restaurant next door. We had steak and beans for 60 cents which is quite good.

    I wish you could have seen the Centre on Opening Day. There were French and American Flags on the balconies and two big flag poles with them cut in front. The lobby was full of flowers and we shipped all our rooms in shape for open house. Everyone was quite impressed with it, as am I. Do you realize that we have maid service – and even if I attempt to make my bed she rips it apart later and makes it again. Needless to say, I don’t argue with her. Maybe I told you this, but I can’t get over it.

    Last Sunday morning we went to a little Protestant church nearby. The service was all in French – it seemed quite different when we were singing the hymns. It was raining so we spent the afternoon studying etc.

    One afternoon last week when it was clear and very crisp outside I stopped on my way back from downtown at a little stand on the sidewalk. It is run by two old women who are just ancient but they are ably aided by a yellow mutt who guards them faithfully. It is just around the corner from the Centre so we all say “Bonjour” now when we go there for the candies and fruit that they sell. This day they were roasting chestnuts and I couldn’t resist the smell as I was going by. I bought some and Gail and I had them in our room that afternoon. If you ever get a chance you should try them, they are just divine.

    I went and got a French haircut Friday. It was really exciting because I didn’t know how to tell them what I wanted. By the time I left I had quite a language lesson because they were very talkative and friendly and insisted on writing out all the phrases for me to remember. They even told me how to get my skirts shortened as they are all about 2 inches too long. A haircut, shampoo, styling and set costs $2.00 here. There are no bargains in clothes that I can see in France except gloves.

    Yesterday Gail and I went to the flower market which is set up Wednesday and Saturday. Stalls of flowers are set up in the market place and you can walk along just to look or to buy. We finally ended up getting a small bouquet and a pansy for our balcony. It was fun to talk to the people and see all different types of flowers. In the afternoon one of the girls here who has a car took us out to see the country house of Balzac. It was so good to be out in the country because the surroundings here are just inconceivably lovey. I wish I had a camera to show you some of the views we passed. There was a quaint old bridge on a peaceful stream with an old water wheel and I’ll a little ways away with a thatched cottage beside the stream. In some places we saw the peasants farmyards. They have the wine in caves in the hills and ins one places I think they live in the caves because we saw chimneys sticking out of the hills, with doors leading into the cliff. I would love to have gone into some of these places but we don’t really know enough French to make sense to the people yet. We stole some apples off a tree by the road. I felt guilty because I know how some poor farmer feels but they tasted awfully good!

    Since we were spending the whole weekend here, two French girls took us for a ride out to a chateau this afternoon. Gail and I talked in French to them all afternoon – or tried to – but at times we had trouble making each other understood. Catherine de Medici furnished all of the rooms of the chateau. It had been restored to a great extent and was very interesting. One floor was brought from Florence – we were afraid to walk on it, it was so ornate. It was on top of a hill with a moat around it. There was a date by the draw bridge which was 1551. The view was splendid because we could see miles up and down the Loire. There is so much to see here that is new and different, I just can’t assimilate it all.

    Gail and I have both been feeling fine – all the kids from California have been dying in this cool weather we have been having. They don’t mind it as long as the sun is shining but they can’t feature clouds all winter. I think the weather is a lot nicer than what I’ve heard it was going to be like. The towns are cleaner than I was led to believe also. Sometimes we go down the quaint old back streets which are wide enough for one car only and even they are clean – except that the buildings are so very old.

    Guess what? I’ve signed up for. Course in French cooking!! We haven’t’ started anything yet but I can hardly wait to see what it’s like.

    Margi Copithorne

  • 11 Steps to Stop Caring So Much
    28 September 2021

    It’s the last straw. You’ve been hurt again by trying to help someone else. You can’t take it anymore and don’t know what to do. Things have turned toxic, and you need to break free. It’s okay. Relax. In this article, you will learn how to stop caring so much. Let’s get to it. Why... Read more

    The post 11 Steps to Stop Caring So Much appeared first on Happier Human.

  • Raising Kids Who Give Back
    28 September 2021
    Parenting expert Patrick Quinn shares six ideas to teach your children how to volunteer summer.
  • What is Positive Psychology—and What Does it Do for Us?
    28 September 2021
    The science of happiness helps you take control of your health and well-being.
  • Positive Lessons From the Pandemic
    28 September 2021
    Why Building Resilience Is Important (and How to Do It)
  • Listening With Your Heart
    28 September 2021
    Healing the world—and building your own happiness—one conversation, one breath at a time.
  • How Positive Education Can Help Students Flourish
    28 September 2021
    When young people are given to the tools to find happiness within themselves as well as others, everyone wins
  • Dog Days of Happiness
    28 September 2021
    Dogs are the ultimate happiness gurus. Learn how to be as carefree as your four-legged friends.
  • 8 Ways to Tune in to What Really Matters–YOU!
    28 September 2021
    Make self-care a priority to bring more peace and balance into your life.
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28 September 2021

AFL Blogs
  • The five players your team can least afford to lose: GWS Giants
    28 September 2021

    The Greater Western Sydney Giants finished seventh in 2021, with 11 wins, one draw and ten losses, although they are effectively sixth for the purpose of this exercise, due to their semi-final performances against higher-rated teams.

    They had six debutants, while only four players featured in every game: Callan Ward, Harry Himmelberg, Tim Taranto and Isaac Cumming.

    Here are the five players and an honourable mention that the Giants could least afford to lose based.

    Honourable mention: Sam Taylor
    Taylor featured in 17 of 22 games, the Giants winning two, losing two and getting a draw when Taylor was unavailable through injury.

    He averaged the fourth most intercepts of any player in the AFL, an average of 8.47 per game, and averaged the third-most contested marks of any Giants player.

    5. Josh Kelly
    Kelly was extremely consistent in 2021 and was rewarded with a new contract. He averaged the most metres gained in the club, with an average of 454.17. He also averaged the second-most score involvements, with an average of 5.96 per game, as well as the most tackles, an average of 5.61 per game.

    His versatility was a strength as he could play in the midfield or on the wing.

    Last but not least, he led by example.

    4. Jacob Hopper
    Hopper was in the All Australian squad, had at least 21 disposals and only missed one game, which was through injury.

    He averaged the third-most inside 50s of any of GWS player, with an average of 4.30, and the most contested possessions, with an average of 12.04.

    3. Toby Greene
    Greene featured in 18 games, including the elimination final win over the Swans and was named in the All Australian forward pocket.

    He averaged the second-most score involvements of any player in the competition, with an average of 8.28, and kicked at least one goal in every game!

    (Photo by Michael Willson/AFL Photos via Getty Images)

    2. Lachie Whitfield
    Whitfield was unavailable for the opening six games, and the club lost five of the seven games he didn’t play. Along with that, in Round 17 he was subbed out after accumulating just three disposals and the team lost to the Suns by one point!

    He averaged the third-most metres, with an average of 437.65 per game, and 4.53 score involvements per game – remarkable for a player who played predominantly on a half back flank.

    1. Tim Taranto
    Taranto was a revelation, featuring in all 24 games that they played, averaging the most disposals and the most inside 50s at the club.

    He also averaged 5.42 score involvements per game and had the second-most tackles – with an average of 5.33 tackles per game – which shows he worked hard defensively.

  • Coaching great tipping sustained success for Melbourne following drought-breaking premiership
    28 September 2021

    Coaching great Leigh Matthews believes Melbourne is well set for sustained success in the coming years.

    On the back of Simon Goodwin’s side winning the premiership on Saturday night – Melbourne’s first in 57 years – Matthews says the club’s list profile and talent across the park means they are as “well equipped as any premiership team in recent times” to continue their dominance this season for years to come.

    “If you’re talking about Melbourne, they have good big defenders and good medium smalls,” he said on Sportsday.

    “They have a fantastic one-two ruck combination (with Max Gawn and Luke Jackson) and they have (Clayton) Oliver, (Christian) Petracca, (Jack) Viney,(James) Harmes, (Angus) Brayshaw and (Ed) Langdon, that’s a fantastic midfielder group.

    “If you want to be honest, (Ben) Brown and (Tom) McDonald are OK forwards… (Bayley) Fritsch looks to be a pretty solid third tall so he’s very good.

    “Between them it’s pretty good, I think it’s reasonable to say that Melbourne is well equipped as any premiership team in recent times to be a good team for a long time.”

    The Demons will depart Perth in recent days, following a successful premiership campaign which saw them largely base themselves out west in the lead up to the Grand Final.

  • “Bottom of the ladder for facilities”: Melbourne CEO speaks on plans for new club base
    28 September 2021

    Melbourne CEO Gary Pert believes the Demons are on the “bottom of the ladder for facilities” in the AFL.

    Multiple club departments are currently situated across different locations, and the Demons are looking to harmonise all operations under the one roof.

    The club has been working on a design for a new base near AAMI park in Gosch’s paddock, which is set to be funded by a joint venture between Melbourne, the AFL, and the Victorian Government.

    Speaking to SEN’s Dwayne’s World, Pert said the club’s dire situation in terms of training facilities is recognised by the AFL.

    “If (the state government) fast tracked it, I’d be more than happy, I’ve been working on it for three years now,” he said.

    “We’ve won the premiership this year and we’re acknowledged at a government level and by the AFL that we’re clearly on the bottom of the ladder for facilities.”

    “If I was to talk to anyone at the AFL and say, ‘I’ll meet you tomorrow at the Melbourne footy club,’ basically you wouldn’t know what I’m talking about because we’re in three, four, five different locations.”

    The fact of Melbourne’s poor facilities makes the Demons triumph in Saturday’s AFL Grand Final “even more amazing,” according to Pert.

    “It’s started, we’re starting the redevelopment of our oval, we’ve had a junior-sized oval that we’ve been training on for the last 10 years and in the next few weeks that’s going to be resurfaced and enlarged to an MCG length and Marvel (stadium) width oval, so that’s a really big step for us,” he said.

    “Right at the moment, we don’t even have the facilities of a community club, which makes the performance of the players even more amazing.”

    The Demons will return home to Melbourne from Perth in the coming days after breaking the longest premiership drought in the AFL with their win over the Bulldogs.

  • Suns list boss trade update on top 10 draft trio, Brodie, Dunstan and more
    28 September 2021

    Gold Coast list boss Craig Cameron has provided an update on numerous dealings for the club during the upcoming AFL trade period, including a trio of young stars set to come out of contract in 2022.

    The Suns followed a familiar path in 2021, starting fairly before fading in the back half of the season.

    However, important wins over Richmond and the GWS Giants late in the season, coupled with the likely return of numerous injured key players next season, has given the club hope for 2022.

    2018 top 10 draft picks Ben King, Jack Lukosius and Izak Rankine are all out of contract at the end of next season and will face the pull of clubs from their home states.

    When asked about the trio, Cameron told AFL Trade Radio’s The Late Trade the Suns are confident the young guns are invested in the team’s success and hoped they might be able to complete signings over the break.

    “We’d be hopeful we can do some signings this off-season before we get into next year,” he said.

    “Our young blokes are really invested, part of our strategy from the get-go was to bring a bunch of talented young guys together, and they’ve really bonded.

    “They’ve got good hope for the future, but on-field we’ve got to show it.”

    Cameron also commented on the futures of Will Brodie and Darcy Macpherson.

    The pair are in a similar boat, both 23-years old but have struggled to cement their places in the Suns best 22.

    Brodie especially has struggled up north, playing just 24 games in five years after being drafted with pick nine in the 2016 AFL draft.

    “Will’s going into his sixth year next year, and he quite rightly wants to explore his options elsewhere and we’re happy to facilitate that if we can find something for him, we’ll work to that through the trade period,” Cameron said.

    “Darcy is a little bit the same, but he hasn’t been quite as vehement in talking to us around wanting to find another home, but if he did and found something that works for us, then we’d look at that.”

    The Suns have some work to do if they are to bring in any trade targets this off-season with all list spots currently filled and signed for next season, however, it hasn’t stopped Cameron and his team from showing interest in delisted Saint Luke Dunstan.

    “We’ll have to wait until we get through the trade period to see where everything sits, but Luke’s a good player and he played some good games this season so we’d be crazy not to look at a player of his talent if he’s available to rookie list, it just depends what happens through the trade period as to how many rookie selections we have,” Cameron said.

    2022 shapes as a big year for the Suns, with numerous signings still to be completed and coach Stuart Dew out of contract.

  • Melbourne man under investigation for attending Perth AFL grand final allegedly in breach of COVID rules
    28 September 2021
    Police in Western Australia are investigating whether a Melbourne man who may have attended the AFL grand final on Saturday is in breach of a COVID-19 quarantine direction.
  • Dermott Brereton's top AFL commentators, experts and host
    28 September 2021

    If you could put together a commentary team made of all available media talent to call a game of footy, who would you select?

    Dermott Brereton has put together who he believes are the best in the business in terms of hosting a broadcast, calling the game and providing expert commentary.

    He has gone with one host, two callers and two experts.

    See Brereton’s call team below:

    Host: Eddie McGuire

    “Eddie McGuire’s the best host. I declare my interests: he’s a great mate, but really if anyone says they’re as good a host as Eddie, it’s chalk and cheese, he’s the best host we’ve got,” Brereton told SEN’s Bob and Andy.

    Callers: Anthony Hudson and Dwayne Russell

    “Anthony Hudson and I love the way Dwayne Russell calls,” he said.

    Subscribe to the SEN YouTube channel for the latest videos!

    Experts: Jimmy Bartel and Nick Riewoldt

    “I learn the most off Jimmy Bartel listening to him. Jimmy tells me the most of what I want to know when I’m watching a game off-screen that I can’t see and is able to tell me how things have happened in a certain way,” he said.

    “I’ve got him first, he’s clearly the best in my view. I can’t work out why Channel 7 don’t use him more.

    “I love seeing how Nick (Riewoldt) pulls it apart and shows where players are from, how they’ve got there and shows how things have transpired to get there.

    “They’re the two current best at telling me something that I want to know.”

  • Melbourne CEO reveals club's Adam Cerra trade ambitions
    28 September 2021

    Melbourne CEO Gary Pert has spoken on the speculation surrounding the Demons throwing their hat in the ring for Fremantle young gun Adam Cerra, who has requested a trade home to Victoria.

    Cerra still appears to be destined to nominate Carlton in the coming days, however, Melbourne has emerged as another club interested in the 21-year old.

    Speaking on SEN’s Dwayne World, Pert believes the club’s list is in a great spot, featuring plenty of depth.

    “I’m part of all the conversations the list management group is having with all the players and all managers,” he said.

    “We’ve got a list that’s pretty strong, there’s going to be a bit of pressure on us from a salary cap point of view.

    “But I think not only have we got a talented list, but anyone who was looking at the players who ran onto the ground after the Grand Final, there were quite a few of them who deserved to be playing at the highest level.

    “We’ve got a highly talented group, but again we’ll explore all options.”

    It’s unclear how Pert and his list management team would be able to secure Cerra, considering the club has just one pick in the first two rounds at number 33.

    On the specifics of a deal for Cerra, Melbourne’s CEO confirmed they were interested in the star Docker but refused to elaborate on how it would happen.

    “All clubs are going to be talking to the representatives of a young star player like that,” Pert said.

    “Whether you can have the room or be able to pull off the deal, I’d say the majority of clubs are exploring it, but until we think anything’s going to happen with any player, we keep all those conversations highly confidential.”

    The Demons have an extremely young list, seven of their 23 players on Saturday night 21 years old or younger.

  • Grand finals don't reward season's best team, AFLW star Ebony Marinoff says
    28 September 2021
    After a mixed record in do-or-die grand finals, Adelaide Crows AFLW star Ebony Marinoff says it is a shame that one "really bad day" should cost a team a title.
  • Silvagni explains AFL draft points system, how Dogs will land Sam Darcy
    28 September 2021

    Stephen Silvagni has explained the intricacies of the points system in the AFL draft and how the Western Bulldogs will be able to secure Sam Darcy in the 2021 draft.

    Silvagni has worked as a list manager at both GWS and Carlton and has drafted many players under the current, albeit sometimes confusing rules of the draft.

    Darcy, son of Bulldogs legend Luke, is one of the most talented of his draft class, the tall forward rocketing in to pick one calculations with a six-goal haul for the Vic Metro’s under-19’s trial match in June.

    As a father-son prospect, the Bulldogs have the option to match any bid for the 18-year old.

    Silvagni explained exactly how the Dogs will look to land their prized draftee.

    “They can go into points deficit, but they will try and find the picks,” Silvagni told SEN Breakfast.

    “Each pick has a value, if he goes at pick two, that pick’s worth 2,500 points, plus a 20% discount for father-son or NGAs (Next Generation Academies).

    “So, they’ve got to make up those points within that draft.

    “They’ve got to find 2000 points, so all their picks in the draft have to add up to 2000 points, and they all go (if they match the bid).”

    However, he says that’s not the be-all and end-all, using Fremantle as a past example.

    “If they don’t have enough points with those picks in this year’s draft, the points will come off their first pick in next year’s draft, that’s called going into deficit,” Silvagni said.

    “It’s happened to Fremantle. Fremantle, last year or the year before, there was a bid on one of their NGA players, and they were in deficit in their first-round, so their first pick actually slipped back a couple of spots last year.”

    The Bulldogs first pick currently sits at number 17 in the 2021 AFL draft, meaning they will likely face bids from rival clubs on Darcy.

    The former Carlton list manager says clubs will bid if they think it can benefit them down the track.

    “Ultimately, by me bidding, (you have to ask yourself) ‘Is it going to help me out or is it going to help other picks come in for you, do I really value that player and are we a chance to get him?’” Silvagni said.

    “If you value the player, sure (bid), within reason.

    “I always said that if you value that player and it’s going to help you get that player or it's going to help you get something further down the line, then bid.”

    A club whose bid is matched on a player will then collect the draft picks and points the rival club used to match the original bid.

    Collingwood father-son prospect Nick Daicos and South Australian Jason Horne-Francis are the other two who appear a possibility to be the number one draft pick in 2021.

  • International Cup locked in for 2023
    28 September 2021
    Due to ongoing international border closures impacting travel to and from Australia, the AFL has announced that the next AFL International Cup is scheduled for 2023.

    The event was originally scheduled to be held on the Sunshine Coast in 2020 but was postponed until 2021, due to the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic.

    AFL Executive General Manager Game Development, Andrew Dillon, said it was important to provide certainty for international participants and stakeholders.

    “Given the challenges around the re-opening of borders, and the need for international teams and organisers to proceed with planning the International Cup, we have made the decision that 2023 is the ideal year in which to next host the event.”

    “The International Cup remains a key aspect of the games growth overseas and the scheduling of the event in 2023 returns us to our original three-year schedule. We know that is has been frustrating for teams to prepare for the event alongside Covid and the appreciate the the patienceshown by all of our international players.”

    New Zealand will field both a Men’s and Women’s team for the first time in the competitions history.

    The post International Cup locked in for 2023 appeared first on AFL New Zealand.